Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • rumour (UK, Commonwealth, International)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English rumour, from Old French rumeur, from Latin rūmor ‎(common talk).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rumor ‎(countable and uncountable, plural rumors)

  1. (US, countable) A statement or claim of questionable accuracy, from no known reliable source, usually spread by word of mouth.
    There's a rumor going round that he's going to get married.
  2. (US, uncountable) Information or misinformation of the kind contained in such claims.
    They say he used to be a thief, but that's just rumor.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

HypernymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

rumor ‎(third-person singular simple present rumors, present participle rumoring, simple past and past participle rumored)

  1. (transitive, usually used in the passive voice) To tell a rumor about; to gossip.
    John is rumored to be next in line for a promotion.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *rAwə- ‎(to shout, to roar)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rūmor m ‎(genitive rūmōris); third declension

  1. rumor
  2. rustle, murmur, a murmuring
  3. The voice of the people

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative rūmor rūmōrēs
genitive rūmōris rūmōrum
dative rūmōrī rūmōribus
accusative rūmōrem rūmōrēs
ablative rūmōre rūmōribus
vocative rūmor rūmōrēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • rumor in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • rumor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • RUMOR in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • rumor in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • report says; people say: rumor, fama, sermo est or manat
    • a rumour is prevalent: rumor, fama viget
    • a report, an impression is gaining ground: rumor increbrescit
    • to spread a rumour: rumorem spargere
    • vague rumours reach us: dubii rumores afferuntur ad nos

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

rumor m (plural rumores)

  1. rumour (statement or claim from no known reliable source)
  2. continuous noise
    • 1890, Aluísio Azevedo, O Cortiço
      No confuso rumor que se formava, destacavam-se risos, sons de vozes que altercavam, sem se saber de onde, grasnar de marrecos, cantar de galos, cacarejar de galinhas.

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:rumor.


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin rūmor, rūmōris.

NounEdit

rumor m ‎(plural rumores)

  1. rumor
  2. murmur

Related termsEdit

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