See also: Drum

EnglishEdit

 
A drum (instrument).
 
A scanning machine including a large drum (cylindrical object).
 
Cable drums

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɹʌm/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌm

Etymology 1Edit

Perhaps back-formation from drumslade (drummer), from Middle Dutch trommelslach (drumbeat), from trommel (drum) + slach (beat) (Dutch slag).

Or perhaps borrowed directly from a continental Germanic language; compare Middle Dutch tromme (drum), Middle Low German trumme (drum) et al. Compare also Middle High German trumme, trumbe (drum), Old High German trumba (trumpet).

NounEdit

drum (plural drums)

  1. A percussive musical instrument spanned with a thin covering on at least one end for striking, forming an acoustic chamber; a membranophone.
    Hypernym: percussion instrument
  2. Any similar hollow, cylindrical object.
    Replace the drum unit of your printer.
  3. A barrel or large cylindrical container for liquid transport and storage.
    The restaurant ordered ketchup in 50-gallon drums.
  4. (architecture) The encircling wall that supports a dome or cupola.
  5. (architecture) Any of the cylindrical blocks that make up the shaft of a pillar.
  6. A drumfish (family Sciaenidae).
  7. (Australia slang) A tip; a piece of information.
    • 1985, Peter Carey, Illywhacker, Faber and Faber 2003, page 258:
      ‘he is the darndest little speaker we got, so better sit there and listen to him while he gives you the drum and if you clean out your earholes you might get a bit of sense into your heads.’
Usage notesEdit

When used in the plural, "drums" or "the drums" often specifically means a drum kit as used for contemporary styles such as rock or jazz; a classical percussionist would be very unlikely to say that they "play the drums" on a piece, even if the only parts they play are, indeed, drums (as opposed to marimba or xylophone or similar.)

Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

drum (third-person singular simple present drums, present participle drumming, simple past and past participle drummed)

  1. (intransitive) To beat a drum.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To beat with a rapid succession of strokes.
    The ruffed grouse drums with his wings.
  3. (transitive) To drill or review in an attempt to establish memorization.
    He’s still trying to drum Spanish verb conjugations into my head.
  4. To throb, as the heart.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  5. To go about, as a drummer does, to gather recruits, to draw or secure partisans, customers, etc.; used with for.
  6. Of various animals, to make a vocalisation or mechanical sound that resembles drumming.
    • 1886, Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, H.L. Brækstad, transl., Folk and Fairy Tales, page 85:
      "There is the snipe drumming also. We shall have it fine!" he added, with an air of conviction.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Irish druim, Scottish Gaelic druim (back, ridge).

NounEdit

drum (plural drums)

  1. (now rare) A small hill or ridge of hills.
Usage notesEdit
  • Mainly encountered in place names, such as Drumglass and Drumsheugh.

Etymology 3Edit

Origin unknown.

NounEdit

drum (plural drums)

  1. (now historical) A social gathering or assembly held in the evening. [from 18th c.]
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, page 631:
      Another misfortune which befel poor Sophia, was the company of Lord Fellamar, whom she met at the opera, and who attended her to the drum.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol. IV, ch. 105:
      [H]e was engaged in a partie of cards, at a drum in the house of a certain lady of quality [] .
  2. (slang, chiefly Britain) A person's home; a house or other building, especially when insalubrious; a tavern, a brothel. [from 19th c.]
Derived termsEdit
  • drummer (housebreaker; travelling salesman)

ReferencesEdit

  • drum at OneLook Dictionary Search

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Greek δρόμος (drómos, road, track). Compare Romanian drum.

NounEdit

drum n (plural drumuri)

  1. road

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English drum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

drum m (plural drums, diminutive drummetje n)

  1. (music) drum, usually one belonging to a drum kit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

drum

  1. Contraction of darum.

Further readingEdit

  • drum” in Duden online

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Greek δρόμος (drómos, road, track).

NounEdit

drum n (plural drumuri)

  1. road

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Language in Danger Andrew Dalby, 2003

ReferencesEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Greek δρόμος (drómos, road, track).

NounEdit

drȕm m (Cyrillic spelling дру̏м)

  1. road

DeclensionEdit