grapevine

See also: Grapevine

EnglishEdit

 
Grapevines

EtymologyEdit

grape +‎ vine

NounEdit

grapevine (plural grapevine or grapevines)

  1. The plant, a vine of genus Vitis, on which grapes grow.
    Synonym: winetree
    Although many grape vines have geographical names, those rarely reflect their real origin, if known at all.
  2. A rumor.
    • 1937 February, Hudson Hawley, “There IS a Saluting Demon”, in American Legion Monthly[1], volume 22, number 2, page 23:
      The legend, like all army grapevine, got around to me.
    • 2009, Sinikiwe Joyce Msindo, Sweet Lemons, page 9:
      The grapevine was that the reason for the school closure was to do with the fact that a lot of students from Bonda had absconded to go to war because Bonda was close to the border between Mozambique and Zimbabwe.
    • 2020 January 13, “Pullela Gopichand blames Prakash Padukone for encouraging Saina Nehwal to leave Hyderabad”, in ESPN:
      The grapevine was that Saina believed that Gopichand was focussing more on PV Sindhu.·
  3. An informal person-to-person means of circulating information or gossip.
    Synonyms: jungle drums, bush telegraph, jungle telegraph, mulga wire, rumor mill
    I heard through the grapevine that Jim will be leaving soon.
  4. (skating) A move in which the feet are alternately placed in front of each other, while both remaining on the ice or ground, incorporating half-turns.
  5. (wrestling) A leglock.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

grapevine (third-person singular simple present grapevines, present participle grapevining, simple past and past participle grapevined)

  1. (transitive, wrestling) To restrain in a leglock.