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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

zeer (plural zeers)

  1. Alternative form of zir (water jug)
    • 1908, Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories, Report of the Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories at the Gordon Memorial College, Khartoum v. 3, 1908 suppl:
      Cholera is in the majority of cases a water-borne disease, due to water having become Cholera-contaminated [...] Water from zeers and goulahs should be looked upon with suspicion unless these are carefully watched and cleaned.
    • 1910, Sir Ronald Ross, The Prevention of Malaria, page 535:
      Before leaving Khartoum the bilge water in the various sections should be oiled by pouring petroleum on the surface [...] collections will harbour mosquito larvae, and attention should therefore be paid to the water-closet cisterns, zeers and tanks.

Crimean TatarEdit

NounEdit

zeer

  1. A poison

DeclensionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /zeːr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: zeer
  • Rhymes: -eːr

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch sêer, from Old Dutch sēr, from Proto-Germanic *sairaz.

AdjectiveEdit

zeer (comparative zeerder, superlative zeerst)

  1. sore, painful
  2. painful, grieving
  3. hurtful
  4. affected by a painful skin syndrome
InflectionEdit
Inflection of zeer
uninflected zeer
inflected zere
comparative zeerder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial zeer zeerder het zeerst
het zeerste
indefinite m./f. sing. zere zeerdere zeerste
n. sing. zeer zeerder zeerste
plural zere zeerdere zeerste
definite zere zeerdere zeerste
partitive zeers zeerders
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: seer

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch sêer, from Old Dutch sēr, from Proto-Germanic *sairą.

NounEdit

zeer n (plural zeren, diminutive zeertje n)

  1. A physical pain, ache, hurt
  2. grief, suffering
  3. (archaic) A sore spot; crust on a wound, boil etc.
  4. (archaic) A cause of physical pain, notably disease; discomfort, uneasiness
  5. (obsolete) A flaw, fault, sin, defect
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle Dutch sêre, from Old Dutch sēro, from Proto-Germanic *sairaz. Equivalent to adverbial use of etymology 1.

AdverbEdit

zeer

  1. very, to a high degree or intensity
  2. (literally) sorely, painfully, notably in zeer doen (to hurt)
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

AnagramsEdit