Last modified on 8 July 2014, at 17:50
See also:

EsperantoEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  • Perhaps from the Greek -ou imperative (pronounced [u]) of deponent verbs such as dekhou "receive!", or from the Hebrew imperative -û. It may instead—or also—be connected to the vowel of the Esperanto conditional suffix -us, minus the s of the indicative inflections.

SuffixEdit

-u

  1. do [it]! (jussive inflection of verbs.)

Etymology 2Edit

  • Apparently connected to the u at the end of unu (one, a certain).

SuffixEdit

-u

  1. -one. (Ending of the individual correlatives.)

FinnishEdit

SuffixEdit

-u (front vowel harmony variant -y)

  1. Forms nouns from verbs. Most common with e- and i-stem verbs.
    hyppi- (to be jumping) → hyppy (jump)
    itke- (to cry) → itku (cry(ing))
    pese- (to wash) → pesu (wash(ing))
    potki- (to kick) → potku (kick)
    urheile- (to practice sport) → urheilu (sport)
  2. Derives a number of nouns from other nouns.
    silmä (eye) → silmu (bud)
    sisä- (inside) → sisu (determination, perseverance)

Usage notesEdit

The front-harmonic variant -y is only used when the first vowel of the word is one of the harmonic front vowels y, ä, ö; words beginning with neutral front vowels e, i take the back-harmonic variant.

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin -utum (accusative of -utus).[1] Cognate to Italian -uto (as in barbuto) and Spanish -udo (as in barbudo).

SuffixEdit

-u

  1. Forming adjectives having the sense of ‘having quality of, being provided of’ (the root word).
    barbe (beard) --> barbu (bearded)
    ventre (belly) --> ventru (pot-bellied, rounded)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ -u, -ue; in: Jacqueline Picoche, Jean-Claude Rolland, Dictionnaire étymologique du français, Paris 2009, Dictionnaires Le Robert

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

-u

  1. Romanization of -𐌿

MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic ـهُ (-hu)

Alternative formsEdit

PronounEdit

-u m

  1. him, it

Usage notesEdit

  • Affixed to the verb directly:
qatel (he killed) + -u = qatlu (he killed him)

Related termsEdit


MaoriEdit

SuffixEdit

-u

  1. Used in contractions with particles of possession to mean you

See alsoEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From suppletive fusion of Old English feminine ending -u, -o and Proto-Germanic *-į̄ (feminine abstract ending). Akin to Gothic feminine abstracts in -ei (compare 𐌼𐌹𐌺𐌹𐌻𐌴𐌹 (mikilei, greatness); 𐌳𐌹𐌿𐍀𐌴𐌹 (diupei, depth)).

SuffixEdit

-u f

  1. ending used to form abstract nouns from adjectives (compare Modern English -ness), often causing i-mutation, and remaining even when preceded by a long syllable
    ieldu (age), from eald "old"
    hāligu (holiness)
    hǣlu "wholeness, heath"
    hǣtu "heat, warmth"
    menniscu "humanity"
    miċelu "greatness, size"

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

In later Old English, -u became -o and the declension altered to reflect the following paradigm