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U+698E, 榎
CJK UNIFIED IDEOGRAPH-698E

[U+698D]
CJK Unified Ideographs
[U+698F]

Contents

TranslingualEdit

Han characterEdit

(radical 75, +10, 14 strokes, cangjie input 木一山水 (DMUE), four-corner 41947, composition)

ReferencesEdit

  • KangXi: page 542, character 21
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 15219
  • Dae Jaweon: page 930, character 28
  • Hanyu Da Zidian: volume 2, page 1263, character 2
  • Unihan data for U+698E

ChineseEdit

simp. and trad.

Glyph originEdit

Characters in the same phonetic series () (Zhengzhang, 2003) 
Old Chinese
*kraːʔ
*sraːs, *ɡraːʔ
*sqʰraːs, *qraːds
*ɡraːʔ, *ɡraːs

PronunciationEdit


Rime
Character
Reading # 1/1
Initial () (28)
Final () (98)
Tone (調) Rising (X)
Openness (開合) Open
Division () II
Fanqie
Reconstructions
Zhengzhang
Shangfang
/kˠaX/
Pan
Wuyun
/kᵚaX/
Shao
Rongfen
/kaX/
Edwin
Pulleyblank
/kaɨX/
Li
Rong
/kaX/
Wang
Li
/kaX/
Bernard
Karlgren
/kaX/
Expected
Mandarin
Reflex
jiǎ
Zhengzhang system (2003)
Character
Reading # 1/1
No. 13449
Phonetic
component
Rime
group
Rime
subdivision
0
Corresponding
MC rime
Old
Chinese
/*kraːʔ/
Notes

DefinitionsEdit

  1. small evergreen shrub

JapaneseEdit

KanjiEdit

(“Jinmeiyō” kanji used for names)

ReadingsEdit

CompoundsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
Japanese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ja
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
(e, enoki): the Chinese hackberry tree.
Kanji in this term

Jinmeiyō
kun’yomi

From Old Japanese. Found in the Man'yōshū, completed some time after 759 CE.[1]

There are various theories regarding the ultimate derivation of this e. Some of these include:

  • From (e, eda, branch), from the many branches
  • From (e, esa, food for animals), from the multitude of berries eaten by birds
  • From (e, handle), from the way the wood was used for tool handles

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

(hiragana , rōmaji e)

  1. Celtis sinensis, the Chinese hackberry tree
    Synonym: (enoki) (see below)
  2. (rare) the Chinese hackberry fruit
    Synonym: 榎の実 (e no mi, enoki no mi)
Usage notesEdit

This reading is generally not used in isolation in modern Japanese.

Etymology 2Edit

Kanji in this term
えのき
Jinmeiyō
kun’yomi

Compound of (e, Chinese hackberry) +‎ (no, possessive particle) +‎ (ki, tree). Compare the similar formation of various other tree names, such as (kusu, camphor; camphor tree) and (kusunoki, camphor tree).

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

(hiragana えのき, katakana エノキ, rōmaji enoki)

  1. Celtis sinensis, the Chinese hackberry tree
Usage notesEdit

As with many terms that name organisms, this term is often spelled in katakana, especially in biological contexts, as エノキ.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ c. 759, Man'yōshū (book 16, poem 3872), text here
  2. ^ 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, →ISBN
  3. ^ 1998, NHK日本語発音アクセント辞典 (NHK Japanese Pronunciation Accent Dictionary) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: NHK, →ISBN

Further readingEdit

Etymology at Nihonjiten (in Japanese)


KoreanEdit

HanjaEdit

(ga) (hangeul , revised ga, McCune–Reischauer ka, Yale ka)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.