EnglishEdit

 
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The Taiwanese flag

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

c. 1600s, from earlier Tayuan, Tayoan, or other variants, from Siraya taywan from tayw (people) + an (place). Recorded in Dutch as Tayouan (and other variants), and in Min Nan as 大員 (Tāi-oân) (and other variants).[1] The term initially referred to a sandy peninsula in the area of modern-day Anping District, Tainan, and eventually became the name of the entire island. See also 臺灣台灣台湾 (Táiwān). Incorrectly understood (via the meaning of the Chinese characters) to mean 'terraced bay' and similar.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan

  1. Common name for a country in East Asia. Official name: Republic of China. Its capital is Taipei. [from 20th c.]
    Synonyms: Chinese Taipei; Republic of China; ROC; Taiwan, Penghu, Kinmen, and Matsu
    • 1971, Johnson, Lyndon, “Feeding the Hungry: India's Food Crisis”, in The Vantage Point[2], Holt, Reinhart & Winston, →ISBN, LCCN 74-102146, OCLC 1067880747, page 224:
      India was not alone in its predicament or in its policy. While a few developing countries like Taiwan, Mexico, and Thailand had made remarkable progress in agriculture and had experienced success in curbing their population increases, others were nearly as bad off as India, even without a drought.
    • 1996 March 15, Linton, Leyla, “London students sing their defiance”, in The Times[3], number 65,528, ISSN 0140-0460, OCLC 502384265, Overseas News, page 14, column 2:
      Pei Ling Wu, 30, said: "I am worried about my family, but they do not want to leave Taiwan. They want to defend their country and fight to the end. If China continues to push us, independence is the only solution."
    • 2022 September 11 [September 09, 2022], Lee, Hsin-fang; Jonathan Chin, “Letter calls for Taiwan’s UN inclusion”, in Taipei Times[4], archived from the original on 11 September 2022, Front Page:
      “Meeting all the criteria of statehood under international law, Taiwan has long been an independent and sovereign country,” they said. “It is a proactive major contributor to the international community — a beacon of democracy for countries around the world to emulate.”
      The “continued exclusion of Taiwan from the UN system is not only unwise, unjust and unfair, but also is a blatant violation of the principles of universality and self-determination as enshrined in the UN Charter, and must be rectified immediately,” they said.
      “The time is now for the United Nations and the rest of the world to jointly stand up against China and its lawless and out-of-control bullying of Taiwan,” they said, adding: “Enough is Enough.”
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taiwan.
  2. A large island between the Taiwan Strait and Philippine Sea, also known as Formosa.
    Synonym: Formosa
    • 1888, Wilson, James Harrison, chapter III, in China: Travels and Investigations in the "Middle Kingdom": A Study of Its Civilization and Possibilites[5], OCLC 835707181, page 26:
      The Government claims suzerainty over and receives tribute more or less regularly from Corea, and also from Anam, Siam, Burmah, and part of the Loochoo Islands, and it has recently erected the beautiful and extensive Island of Formosa, or Taiwan, hitherto attached to the province of Fo-Kien, into a separate province with its own governor-general who, like those of the other provinces, is appointed directly from Peking.
    • 1963, Eisenhower, Dwight, “Formosa Doctrine”, in Mandate for Change 1953-1956[6], Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, LCCN 63-18447, OCLC 64309101, page 460:
      As a result of the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-95, China lost to Japan the important islands of Taiwan (Formosa) and the Pescadores, lying about a hundred miles off the Chinese coast.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taiwan.
  3. An administrative division centered on the island of Taiwan.
    Synonym: Formosa
    1. (historical) An administrative division of the Qing (Ching) dynasty (Manchu).
      1. (historical) A prefecture of Fujian.
        • 1864, Swinhoe, Robert, “Notes on the Island of Formosa.”, in The Journal of the Royal Geographic Society of London[7], volume XXXIV, London: John Murray, published 1865, ISSN 0266-6235, OCLC 66168045, page 6:
          TAIWAN, or Chinese Formosa, is considered a Foo or district of the province of Fokien, and is governed by a Taoutai extraordinary, who, though responsible to the provincial viceroy, possesses the privilege of memorialising the Throne direct. “The district of Taiwan,” says the Chinese Government Chart, of which a copy was supplied to me by the Formosan authorities, “is bounded in the rear by mountains, and in front by the sea. The ancestral hills of Formosa derive their origin from the Woo-hoo-mun (Five Tiger Gate), the entrance to Foochow, whence they glided across the sea. In the ocean towards the east are two places called Tungkwan (Damp Limit) and Pih-mow (White Acre), which mark the spots where the dragons of the Formosan hills emerged. These sacred reptiles had pierced unseen the depths of ocean, and announcing their ascent to the surface by throwing up the bluff at Kelung-head, by a number of violent contortions heaved up the regular series of hills, valleys, and plains that extend north and south in varied undulations for the space of 1000 leagues (applied figuratively). The mountain-peaks are too multitudinous to enumerate, and the geography of the island too comprehensive to take into present consideration ; we will therefore confine ourselves to a few general remarks. In rear of the hills, eastward, flows the ocean ; facing them, to the westward, is the sea ; and between lies the prefecture of Taiwan.”
        • 1887 February, Campbell, W., “A Few Notes from the Pescadores.”, in Chinese Recorder and Missionary Journal[8], volume XVIII, number 2, Shanghai: American Presbyterian Mission Press, OCLC 14697053, page 62:
          THE PESCADORES, consisting of over twenty inhabited islands, besides several inlets and rocks, lie off the south-western coast of Formosa at a minimum distance of about twenty-five miles, and the entire group is set down on the charts as extending from latitude 23° 12′ to 23° 47′ N., and from longitude 119° 19′ to 119° 41′ E. They form together the Dashing Lake District or Ting, 澎湖廳, of the Taiwan Prefecture, and are placed under the control of resident civil and military mandarins who report to their superior officers at Taiwanfoo.
        • 1980, Myers, Ramon H., “The Public Sector: The State”, in The Chinese Economy Past and Present[9], →ISBN, LCCN 79-13173, OCLC 225696518, pages 78-79:
          In effect each area paid an assigned land tax quota, which was allocated among households — depending upon the amount of land they owned and registered with the land tax office. Households paid this tax in silver, and by 1736 the state collected this kind of land tax in all provinces except Shansi, Taiwan prefecture (part of Fukien province), and Kweichow.
        • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taiwan.
      2. (historical) A province. [from late 19th c.]
        • 1896, Clark, J. D., Formosa[10], Shanghai: Shanghai Mercury, OCLC 38700620, page 44:
          In 1885 Governor LIU determined to reconstruct Taipei and make it the temporary capital until, the railway having on its way to Taiwan reached the old town of Changhua, in about the middle of Formosa, he should build a city near that place and make it, under the name of Taiwan, the capital of the province of Taiwan.
        • 1898, “Bang-ka, or Mang-ka”, in Johnson's Universal Cyclopædia: A New Edition[11], volume I, New York: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 11983522, page 480, column 2:
          Near Bang-ka is Twa-tu-tia, the great center of the tea-trade of Formosa, and the capital of the province of Taiwan (i. e. Formosa) from 1885 to 1896.
        • 1918, Morse, Hosea Ballou, “France and Tongking”, in The International Relations of the Chinese Empire[12], volume II, Longmans, Green, and Co., OCLC 499680737, page 861:
          The Chinese forces holding Formosa numbered about 50,000 men, and its defence was ably conducted by Liu Ming-chüan, then imperial High Commissioner ad hoc afterwards first governor of the newly created province of Taiwan.
        • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taiwan.
    2. (historical) A colony of Japan. [from late 19th c.]
      • 1902, “Appendix”, in The Isle of Man, Gibraltar, Malta, St Helena, Barbados, Cyrpus, the Channel Islands, the British Army & Navy (The British Empire Series)‎[13], volume V, OCLC 769916016, page 649:
        Taiwan (Formosa) and Hōkotō (the Pescadores) were ceded to Japan upon the close of the Chinese War of 1895. Taiwan has a Governor-General with extreme powers, and is now an integral part of Japan.
      • 1913, Salwey, Charlotte M., “Formosa, the Beautiful (Taiwan)”, in The Island Dependencies of Japan[14], London: Eugène L. Morice, OCLC 1337038, page 39:
        Taiwan is governed by a Governor-General. Since 1895 three Governors have resigned. The present in office is General Count Samata Sakuma.
      • 1938 July 29, “Amoy is Island Key to South China's Strategic Province”, in The Winchester Star[15], volume LVIII, number 1, Winchester, Mass., ISSN 1093-0515, OCLC 23036035, page 2, column 5:
        Amoy is one of the three Chinese ports closer to the Japanese colony of Taiwan (Formosa) than are any ports in the Japanese Empire proper.
      • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taiwan.
    3. A province of the Republic of China. [from 20th c.]
      • 1957, Chiang, Chung-cheng (Kai-shek), Soviet Russia in China: A Summing-up at Seventy[16], New York: Farrar, Straus and Cudahy, LCCN 57010316, OCLC 955026629, pages 239-240:
        The Chinese Government today, with its program of local self-government in Taiwan, provides a revealing contrast to the Communist totalitarian "democratic dictatorship" on the mainland. Herein lies the foundation for our eventual victory against Communism.
      • 1988 January 25, Willey, Fay; Carroll Bogert; Dorinda Elliott; David Newell, “End of a Dynasty and an Era”, in Newsweek[17], volume CXI, number 4, ISSN 0028-9604, OCLC 818916146, International, page 34, column 3:
        By all accounts, Lee lacks Chiang's charisma. The son of a rice farmer from northern Taiwan, he trained as an agronomist at Cornell University, then served as mayor of Taipei and governor of Taiwan Province, where he won widespread popularity.
      • 2000, Chen, Shui-Bian, “From Elected Representative to Administrative Chief”, in David J. Toman, transl., The Son of Taiwan: The Life of Chen Shui-Bian and His Dreams for Taiwan[18], Taiwan Publishing Co., Ltd., →ISBN, OCLC 45640623, page 84:
        In August 1993, I began preparing to run in the first race for mayor of Taipei elected directly by popular vote, to be held in December 1994. At the same time, the positions of mayor of Kaohsiung City and governor of Taiwan Province were also up for direct popular election.
      • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taiwan.
    4. A claimed province of the People's Republic of China (mainland China). [from mid 20th c.]
      • 1964, Jen Yu-ti (任育地), “Seas”, in A Concise Geography of China (中国地理概述)[19], Peking: Foreign Languages Press, OCLC 799178199, OL 5937311M, pages 42-43:
        The eastern part of Taiwan Province is washed by the Pacific Ocean while the mainland coast borders on the Pohai, the Yellow, the East China and the South China Seas, each with its different depth and water temperature.
      • 1992, Zhou, Shunwu (周舜武), “Overview”, in China Provincial Geography (中国分省地理)[20], Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, →ISBN, OCLC 27900199, page 499:
        China (excluding Taiwan Province) has 381 cities as of the end of 1987, including 3 provincial-level cities, 170 provincially administered cities and 208 township-level cities. In addition there are 1,985 counties (including autonomous counties, banners and autonomous banners) in China.
      • 2011 [31 January 1979], Carter, Jimmy, White House Diary[21], →ISBN, LCCN 2010015544, OCLC 712116640, page 286:
        I had my final meeting with Deng Xiaoping. We signed agreements concerning consular offices, trade, science and technology, cultural exchange, and so forth. After discussing the political problems I had in normalization, Zbig asked him, "Did you have political opposition in China?" Everybody listened very carefully when Deng said, "Yes, I had serious opposition in one province in China—Taiwan."
      • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taiwan.
  4. (historical) Synonym of Tainan (major city in southern Taiwan; former capital city).[2]
    • 1877 November 8, “Robert Swinhoe, F.R.S.”, in Nature[22], volume XVII, number 419, ISSN 0028-0836, OCLC 01586310, page 35, column 2:
      In 1860 Mr. Swinhoe attended Gen. Napier, and afterwards Sir Hope Grant, the Commander-in-Chief, as interpreter, and received a medal for war service. At the end of the same year he was appointed Vice-Consul at Taiwan, Formosa, and in 1865 to the full Consulship.
    • 1885 January 7, “Summary of News”, in North-China Herald and Supreme Court & Consular Gazette[23], volume XXXIV, number 913, Shanghai, OCLC 311405954, page 4, column 2:
      Evidently the French blockade of Formosa is not very effective, or else the Pescadores are not included in the blockaded district. The Daily Press of 31st December states:—We learn by private letter that there have been no blockading ships at Taiwan or at Takao during the last seven days. The blockade is a purely paper one. Troops and treasure are pouring into South Formosa.
    • 1896, Clark, J. D., Formosa[24], Shanghai: Shanghai Mercury, OCLC 38700620, page 44:
      In 1885 Governor LIU determined to reconstruct Taipei and make it the temporary capital until, the railway having on its way to Taiwan reached the old town of Changhua, in about the middle of Formosa, he should build a city near that place and make it, under the name of Taiwan, the capital of the province of Taiwan.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taiwan.
  5. (astronomy) 2169 Taiwan, a main belt asteroid. [from mid 20th c.]
    • 2005, Vokrouhlický, D.; et al., “Yarkovsky/YORP chronology of asteroid families”, in Icarus[25], volume 182, number 1, published 2006, DOI:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.12.010, ISSN 0019-1035, OCLC 1752499, page 126, column 2:
      For the Massalia family, we only have information on (20) Massalia (pv = 0.21±0.01). Finally, for the Astrid family, we have (1128) Astrid with pv = 0.077±0.010 and (2169) Taiwan with pv = 0.099±0.020. In each of these cases, the values conform to the taxonomic type of the corresponding families.
    • 2019 August 29, “Asteroid 'Taiwan' to come closest to Earth late Thursday: museum”, in Focus Taiwan[26], archived from the original on 10 September 2022, Science & Tech‎[27]:
      2169 Taiwan, a carbonaceous asteroid from the central region of the asteroid belt between Jupiter and Mars, will be at its closest to Earth at around 11 p.m. Thursday, the Taipei Astronomical Museum said.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Taiwan.

Usage notesEdit

Taiwan and Taiwanese are both widely used as attributives, e.g. Taiwan/Taiwanese culture, the Taiwan/Taiwanese government, Taiwan/Taiwanese food, etc.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Mair, V. H. (2010) How to Forget Your Mother Tongue and Remember Your National Language[1]
  2. ^ T'ai-nan, in Encyclopædia Britannica: "T’ai-nan is one of the oldest urban settlements on the island. The Han Chinese settled there as early as 1590 (some sources say earlier), when it was known as T’ai-yüan (Taiyuan), Ta-yüan (Dayuan), or T’ai-wan (Taiwan)—a name that was later extended to the whole island."

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

from Mandarin 臺灣台湾 (Táiwān) from Dutch Tayouan, from Siraya taywan.(Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan m

  1. Taiwan

Derived termsEdit


CzechEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan m

  1. Taiwan

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Chinese 臺灣, from Dutch Tayouan; see the Chinese entry and English Taiwan for more.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan n

  1. Taiwan

FinnishEdit

 
Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fi

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan

  1. Taiwan

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of Taiwan (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative Taiwan
genitive Taiwanin
partitive Taiwania
illative Taiwaniin
singular plural
nominative Taiwan
accusative nom. Taiwan
gen. Taiwanin
genitive Taiwanin
partitive Taiwania
inessive Taiwanissa
elative Taiwanista
illative Taiwaniin
adessive Taiwanilla
ablative Taiwanilta
allative Taiwanille
essive Taiwanina
translative Taiwaniksi
instructive
abessive Taiwanitta
comitative
Possessive forms of Taiwan (type risti)
possessor singular plural
1st person Taiwanini Taiwanimme
2nd person Taiwanisi Taiwaninne
3rd person Taiwaninsa

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

 
German Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia de

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /taɪ̯ˈvaːn/, (also) /ˈtaɪ̯ˌvaːn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aːn

NounEdit

Taiwan n (proper noun, genitive Taiwans or (optionally with an article) Taiwan)

  1. Taiwan (an island and partly-recognized country in East Asia)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Taiwan” in Duden online
  • Taiwan” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tajˈwan/
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Hyphenation: Tai‧wàn

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan m

  1. Taiwan

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


MarshalleseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English Taiwan

PronunciationEdit

  • (phonetic) IPA(key): [tˠɑːiwɑnʲ], (enunciated) [tˠɑ iwɑnʲ]
  • (phonemic) IPA(key): /tˠæɰjiwænʲ/
  • Bender phonemes: {tahyiwan}

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan

  1. Taiwan.

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan

  1. Taiwan

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan

  1. Taiwan

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


Orizaba NahuatlEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan

  1. Taiwan (a country in Asia)

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English Taiwan, from Mandarin 臺灣台湾 (Táiwān).

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: Tai‧wan

Proper nounEdit

Taiwan m

  1. Taiwan, Republic of China (a country in East Asia)
    Synonyms: Formosa, República da China
  2. Taiwan, Formosa (the main island of the Republic of China)
    Synonym: Formosa

Derived termsEdit