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See also: 'bout

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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bught, probably from an unrecorded Old English variant of byht (a bend). [1] See bight, bought.

NounEdit

bout (plural bouts)

  1. A period of something, usually painful or unpleasant
    a bout of drought.
  2. (boxing) A boxing match.
  3. (fencing) An assault (a fencing encounter) at which the score is kept.
  4. (roller derby) A roller derby match.
  5. A fighting competition.
  6. (music) A bulge or widening in a musical instrument, such as either of the two characteristic bulges of a guitar.
  7. (dated) The going and returning of a plough, or other implement used to mark the ground and create a headland, across a field.
    • 1809, A Letter to Sir John Sinclair [] containing a Statement of the System under which a considerable Farm is profitably managed in Hertfordshire. Given at the request of the Board. By Thomas Greg, Esq., published in The Farmer's Magazine, page 395:
      The outside bout of each land is ploughed two inches deeper, and from thence the water runs into cross furrows, which are dug with a spade [] I have an instrument of great power, called a scarifier, for this purpose. It is drawn by four horses, and completely prepares the land for the seed at each bout.
    • 1922, An Ingenious One-Way Agrimotor, published in The Commercial Motor, volume 34, published by Temple Press, page 32:
      It is in this manner that the ploughs are reversed at the termination of each bout of the field.
    • 1976, Claude Culpin, Farm Machinery, page 60:
      The last two rounds must be ploughed shallower, and on the last bout the strip left should be one furrow width for a two-furrow plough, two for a three-furrow, and so on. []
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bout (third-person singular simple present bouts, present participle bouting, simple past and past participle bouted)

  1. To contest a bout.

Etymology 2Edit

Written form of a reduction of about.

PrepositionEdit

bout

  1. (colloquial) Aphetic form of about
    They're talking bout you!
    Maddy is bout to get beat up!

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch bout, from Old Dutch *bolt, from Proto-Germanic *bultaz. Compare German Bolzen, West Frisian bout, English bolt, Danish bolt, Icelandic bolti.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɑu̯t/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑu̯t
  • Homophones: boud, bouwt

NounEdit

bout m (plural bouten, diminutive boutje n)

  1. bolt (threaded metal cylinder)
    • 2004, Wim Ravesteijn, Jan H. Kop, Bouwen in de Archipel. Burgerlijke openbare werken in Nederlands-Indië 1800-2000, page 104.
      Deze werd door speciale bouten verbonden.
      This was secured by special bolts.
  2. haunch, leg of an animal as food
    • '2010, Ilse D'hooge, Het complete Libelle pastaboek.
      Roer regelmatig om alle boutjes gelijkmatig te kleuren.
      Stir regularly to give all haunches an even colour.
    Synonyms: poot, schenkel
  3. (vulgar) fart
    • 2000 March 31, RAYMOND HOFSTE, “passie voor bruine bonen, "Pffffffrrrtttt" Aaaaaaaaaaa.”, in alt.humor.dutch, Usenet[1]:
      De bout was niet alleen hard maar stonk ook als een rot ei.
      The fart wasn't just loud but also stank like a rotten egg.
    Synonyms: buikwind, scheet, ruft, wind
  4. bolt (crossbow arrow)
    • 1875, Willem Jacob Hofdijk, De oude schutterij in Nederland, page 19.
      Het lichtere esschenhout diende tot pylen of bouten.
      The lighter ash wood was used for arrows or bolts.
    Synonyms: kruisboogbout, schicht
  5. (Surinam) thigh
  6. bar, rod
    Synonyms: staaf, stang
  7. (archaic) darling, sweetheart, dear
    Synonyms: lieverd, lieveling, schat, schattebout
  8. iron (apparatus for ironing clothing)
    • 1986, Jan Terlouw, Gevangenis met een open deur, page 21.
      De bout stoomde nog.
      The clothes iron was still steaming.
    Synonyms: strijkbout, strijkijzer

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Old French bout (a blow), derivative of bouter (to strike), of Germanic origin. More at bouter.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bout m (plural bouts)

  1. end, extremity, tip (of a physical object)
  2. bit, piece, scrap
  3. (nautical) rope

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

bout

  1. third-person singular present indicative of bouillir

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

bout m (oblique plural bouz or boutz, nominative singular bouz or boutz, nominative plural bout)

  1. end (extremity)