See also: daH

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dah ‎(plural dahs)

 
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  1. The spoken representation of a dash in radio and telegraph Morse code.
  2. (Burma) A long knife or sword with a round cross-section grip, a long, gently curving blade with a single edge, and no guard.
    • 1922, Rudyard Kipling, "What Happened", lines 33-36, [1]
      Jowar Singh the Sikh procured sabre, quoit, and mace, / Abdul Huq, Wahabi, jerked his dagger from its place, / While amid the jungle-grass danced and grinned and jabbered / Little Boh Hla-oo and cleared his dah-blade from the scabbard.
    • 1934, George Orwell, Burmese Days, Chapter 22, [2]
      It was like a sea of people, two thousand at the least, black and white in the moon, with here and there a curved dah glittering.

Alternative formsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dah

  1. good, okay

KashmiriEdit

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

dah

  1. ten

MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened sudah.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dah

  1. Done!

NavajoEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

dah

  1. up, off, at an elevation, set off
    dah yooʼááł‎ ― he’s holding it up
    dah diilwod‎ ― he started off at a run

Derived termsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *daigaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeyǵʰ-(to knead, form, mold). Compare Old High German teig (German Teig), Old Norse deig (Danish dej, Swedish deg), Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌹𐌲𐍃(daigs).

NounEdit

dah

  1. dough

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

dah

  1. (Internet slang) Alternative spelling of

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *dъxъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dȁh m ‎(Cyrillic spelling да̏х)

  1. breath
  2. breathing, respiration
  3. stench, odor

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • dah” in Hrvatski jezični portal