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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French feint (pretended), from Old French feindre (to feign).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

feint (third-person singular simple present feints, present participle feinting, simple past and past participle feinted)

  1. To make a feint, or mock attack.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

feint (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Feigned; counterfeit.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Locke?)
      Dressed up into any feint appearance of it.
  2. (fencing, boxing, war) (of an attack) directed toward a different part from the intended strike

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

feint (plural feints)

  1. A movement made to confuse the opponent; a dummy.
  2. That which is feigned; an assumed or false appearance; a pretense or stratagem.
    • Spectator
      Courtley's letter is but a feint to get off.
  3. (fencing, boxing, war) An offensive movement resembling an attack in all but its continuance
  4. The narrowest rule used in the production of lined writing paper (C19: Variant of FAINT)

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Past participle of feindre; from Old French feint, from Latin fictus, probably through the Vulgar Latin form *finctus, with a nasal infix. Compare Italian finto.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fɛ̃/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

feint m (feminine singular feinte, masculine plural feints, feminine plural feintes)

  1. past participle of feindre
  2. third-person singular present indicative of feindre

AnagramsEdit


West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

feint c (plural feinten, diminutive feintsje)

  1. young man
  2. boy
  3. boyfriend
    Coordinate term: faam

Further readingEdit

  • feint”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011