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EnglishEdit

 
A gull

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡʌl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌl

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English gulle, from Brythonic, from Proto-Celtic *wēlannā (seagull). Cognate with Cornish guilan, Welsh gwylan, Breton gouelan, Old Irish faílenn.

NounEdit

gull (plural gulls)

  1. A seabird of the genus Larus or of the family Laridae.
  2. Any of various pierid butterflies of the genus Cepora.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps from an obsolete term gull (swallow).[1]

NounEdit

gull (plural gulls)

  1. (slang) A cheating trick; a fraud.
  2. One easily cheated; a dupe.
  3. (obsolete, Oxford University slang) A swindler or trickster.
    • 1825, Blackmantle, Bernard, The English Spy:
      You'll excuse me, sir, but as you are fresh, take care to avoid the gulls; they fly about here in large flocks, I assure you, and do no little mischief at times." "I never understood that gulls were birds of prey," said I.—"Only in Oxford, sir; and here, I assure you, they bite like hawks, and pick many a poor young gentleman as bare before his three years are expired, as the crows would a dead sheep upon a common. [] "
SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

gull (third-person singular simple present gulls, present participle gulling, simple past and past participle gulled)

  1. To deceive or cheat.
    • Dryden
      The vulgar, gulled into rebellion, armed.
    • Coleridge
      I'm not gulling him for the emperor's service.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act IV, Scene I, verse 162-165
      [] speak your curses out
      Against me, who would sooner crush and grind
      A brace of toads, than league with them to oppress
      An innocent lady, gull an Emperor []
    • 1986, John le Carré, A Perfect Spy:
      She has done these things before and remembers now that she is good at them, often steadier than the men. In Berlin when Jack needed a spare girl Mary had kept watch, gulled room keys out of concierges, replaced stolen documents in dangerous desks, driven scared Joes to safe flats.
  2. (US, slang) To mislead.
  3. (US, slang) To trick and defraud.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ gull” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Further readingEdit


FaroeseEdit

Chemical element
Au Previous: hvítagull, platin (Pt)
Next: kyksilvur, kviksilvur (Hg)

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gull, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gull n (genitive singular guls, uncountable)

  1. gold
  2. (in proverbs) richness, money, livestock
  3. gold medal, first place (sports, etc.)

DeclensionEdit

n9s Singular
Indefinite Definite
Nominative gull gullið
Accusative gull gullið
Dative gulli gullinum
Genitive guls gulsins

IcelandicEdit

 
Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gull (gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gull n (genitive singular gulls, nominative plural gull)

  1. (uncountable) gold
  2. (countable) a cherished thing
  3. (countable) a gold medal or prize
  4. indefinite accusative singular of gull
  5. indefinite nominative plural of gull
  6. indefinite accusative plural of gull

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gull, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gull n (definite singular gullet, uncountable)

  1. gold

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gull and goll, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą. Akin to English gold.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gull n (definite singular gullet, uncountable)

  1. gold

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold). Cognate with Old English gold, Old Frisian gold, Old Saxon gold, Old Dutch golt, Old High German gold, Gothic 𐌲𐌿𐌻𐌸 (gulþ). See also Finnish kulta. Ultimately from Pre-Germanic *ǵʰl̥tóm (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃- (yellow; gleam; to shine).

PronunciationEdit

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /ˈɡulː/

NounEdit

gull n (genitive gulls, plural gull)

  1. (uncountable, singular only) gold
  2. (countable) a jewel, thing of value, especially a finger-ring
    • Stjórn 78, in 1862, C. R. Unger, Stjórn: gammelnorsk Bibelhistorie: fra Verdens Skabelse til det babyloniske Fangenskab. Christiania, page 254:
      Enn þegar sem hon bar þetta gull, []
      But when she wore that ring, []

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • gull in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gull in An Icelandic-English Dictionary, R. Cleasby and G. Vigfússon, Clarendon Press, 1874, at Internet Archive.
  • gull in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gull, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

NounEdit

gull n

  1. (poetic, archaic) gold; standard Swedish guld
    Har du silver har du gull, / har du kistorna full?
    Do you have silver and gold, / are your treasure chests full? (song lyrics)
    Wilt thw wara tik sielffuir hull, / tw älska friiheet meer än gull (Old Swedish, poem by bishop Tomas, 1439)
    Vill du vara dig själver huld, / du älska frihet mer än guld (translated to standard Swedish)
    If you want to help yourself, you should love freedom more than gold
  2. (colloquial) baby, darling, someone dear and cute (gullig), someone to cuddle (gulla med)
    mina små gull
    my little darlings
    Kom nu gullet, det är finfint väder ute
    Come on baby, it's a perfect sunny day

DeclensionEdit

Declension of gull 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative gull gullet gull gullen
Genitive gulls gullets gulls gullens

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gull, goll, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

NounEdit

gull n (definite gullä)

  1. (uncountable) gold
    hä glema som hä wor gullä
    It shines as it were gold.

Derived termsEdit