See also: lọc and LOC

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

loc (plural locs)

  1. (informal, usually in the plural) A dreadlock.
  2. Alternative letter-case form of LOC

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *lātjā, from the same root as lot (teardrop).[1]

NounEdit

loc m (indefinite plural loce, definite singular locja, definite plural locet)

  1. dear, darling
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998) , “loc”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 230

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin locus. Compare Daco-Romanian loc.

NounEdit

loc n (plural locuri)

  1. place, location
  2. land, soil, earth
  3. country, region

SynonymsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *luką.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

loc n

  1. lock
  2. that by which anything is closed (e.g. bolt, bar, etc.)
  3. an enclosed space, enclosure, fold
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle English: loc, lok, lokk, lock
  • Anglo-Norman: loc

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

lōc

  1. Alternative form of lōca

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old English loc, from Proto-Germanic *luką.

NounEdit

loc m (oblique plural los, nominative singular los, nominative plural loc)

  1. lock
    • (Can we date this quote?), La Vie de St Thomas
      Mes a cel ore esteit a un grant loc fermee
      But at this hour, it was closed with a big lock

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from Latin locus.

NounEdit

loc m

  1. place (usually inhabited, or suited thereto)

InflectionEdit

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative loc locL luicL
Vocative luic locL lucuH
Accusative locN locL lucuH
Genitive luicL loc locN
Dative lucL locaib locaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin locus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

loc m (oblique plural locs, nominative singular locs, nominative plural loc)

  1. place

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin locus, from Old Latin stlocus, from Proto-Indo-European *stel- (to put, place, locate).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

loc n (plural locuri)

  1. place, location

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English lock.

NounEdit

loc m (plural lociau, not mutable)

  1. lock (on a canal)

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

loc

  1. Soft mutation of lloc (enclosure, pen).

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
lloc loc unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.