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See also: Cura, curá, curà, curâ, and čura

Contents

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin cūra, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷeys- (to heed).

NounEdit

cura f (plural cures)

  1. care (close attention; concern; responsibility)
    amb molta curawith great care; very carefully
  2. care, treatment (the treatment of those in need)
  3. cure (a method that restores good health)
    Synonyms: guariment, guarició
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

cura

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of curar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of curar

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

cura

  1. third-person singular past historic of curer

GalicianEdit

HausaEdit

VerbEdit

cūrā̀ (grade 1)

  1. to knead into balls

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cūra, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷeys- (to heed).

NounEdit

cura f (plural cure)

  1. care
  2. accuracy
  3. cure
  4. treatment (medical)

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

cura

  1. third-person singular present of curare
  2. second-person singular imperative of curare

LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cura.

NounEdit

cura f (plural cures)

  1. care
  2. treatment

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *kʷeys- (to heed).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈkuː.ra/
  • (file)

NounEdit

cūra f (genitive cūrae); first declension

  1. care, concern, thought; trouble, solicitude; anxiety, grief, sorrow.
    • c. 50 CE, Seneca the Younger, Phaedra, 607
      Curae leues locuntur, ingentes stupent.
      Trivial concerns talk, great ones are speechless.
    • Vergilius, Aeneis, Book VI, line 85
      Mitte hanc de pectore curam.
      Dismiss this anxiety from your heart.
  2. Attention, management, administration, charge, care; command, office; guardianship.
  3. Written work, writing.
  4. (medicine) Medical attendance, healing.
  5. (agriculture) Rearing, culture, care.
  6. (rare) An attendant, guardian, observer.

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cūra cūrae
genitive cūrae cūrārum
dative cūrae cūrīs
accusative cūram cūrās
ablative cūrā cūrīs
vocative cūra cūrae

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

cūrā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of cūrō

ReferencesEdit

  • cura in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cura in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • cura in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • I cannot sleep for anxiety: curae somnum mihi adimunt, dormire me non sinunt
    • to expend great labour on a thing: operam (laborem, curam) in or ad aliquid impendere
    • to be wasting away with grief: aegritudine, curis confici
    • somebody, something is never absent from my thoughts: aliquis, aliquid mihi curae or cordi est
    • to have laid something to heart; to take an interest in a thing: curae habere aliquid
    • to devote one's every thought to the state's welfare: omnes curas et cogitationes in rem publicam conferre
    • to devote one's every thought to the state's welfare: omnes curas in rei publicae salute defigere (Phil. 14. 5. 13)
    • (ambiguous) anxiety troubles and torments one: cura sollicitat angitque aliquem
    • (ambiguous) good-bye; farewell: vale or cura ut valeas
  • cura in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cura in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • cura in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • cura in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cūra, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷeys- (to heed).

NounEdit

cura f (plural curas)

  1. cure (a method, device or medication that restores good health)
  2. healing (the process of restoring good health)

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

cura

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of curar
    Ele cura os doentes.
    He cures the sick.
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of curar
    Tu aí, cura os doentes sozinho.
    You there, cure the sick by yourself.

RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin cūrāre, present active infinitive of cūrō, possibly influenced by colāre.

VerbEdit

a cura (third-person singular present cură, past participle curat1st conj.

  1. (rare) to clean
  2. (regional) to clear, eliminate, deforest
ConjugationEdit
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from German kurieren, itself borrowed from the same Latin root as the above.

VerbEdit

a cura (third-person singular present curează, past participle curat1st conj.

  1. (rare) to cure, treat an illness, care for
ConjugationEdit
SynonymsEdit
See alsoEdit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tsûra/
  • Hyphenation: cu‧ra

NounEdit

cȕra f (Cyrillic spelling цу̏ра)

  1. girl (young woman)
  2. girlfriend (in a relationship)

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin cūra (care, concern), from Proto-Indo-European *kʷeys- (to heed).

NounEdit

cura f (plural curas)

  1. cure (something that restores good health)
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin.

NounEdit

cura m (plural curas)

  1. priest
    Synonyms: párroco, sacerdote

Etymology 3Edit

Unknown.

NounEdit

cura

  1. (Colombia, dated) avocado
    Synonym: aguacate

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

cura

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of curar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of curar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of curar

Further readingEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

cura (definite accusative curayı, plural curalar)

 
Cura and bağlama
  1. (music) a stringed musical instrument

DescendantsEdit