Last modified on 3 March 2015, at 19:24

pant

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English panten, whence also English dialectal pank.

Possibly from Old French pantoyer, a byform or of Old French pantoisier (to be breathless) (compare modern French panteler (to gasp for breath)), of uncertain origin. Possibly from Vulgar Latin *pantasiō (struggling for breath when having a nightmare), from Ancient Greek φαντασιόω (phantasióō, I am subject to hallucinations), from φαντασία (phantasía, appearance, image, fantasy).

NounEdit

pant (plural pants)

  1. A quick breathing; a catching of the breath; a gasp.
  2. (obsolete) A violent palpitation of the heart.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit
ReferencesEdit

VerbEdit

pant (third-person singular simple present pants, present participle panting, simple past and past participle panted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To breathe quickly or in a labored manner, as after exertion or from eagerness or excitement; to respire with heaving of the breast; to gasp.
    • Dryden
      Pluto plants for breath from out his cell.
    • Shelley
      There is a cavern where my spirit / Was panted forth in anguish.
    • 1749, John Cleland, Fanny Hill: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, Part 2
      Charles had just slipp'd the bolt of the door, and running, caught me in his arms, and lifting me from the ground, with his lips glew'd to mine, bore me, trembling, panting, dying, with soft fears and tender wishes, to the bed
  2. (transitive) To long for (something); to be eager for (something).
    • Herbert
      Then shall our hearts pant thee.
  3. (intransitive) To long eagerly; to desire earnestly.
    • Bible, Psalms xlii. 1
      As the hart panteth after the water brooks.
    • Alexander Pope
      Who pants for glory finds but short repose.
  4. (intransitive) Of the heart, to beat with unnatural violence or rapidity; to palpitate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  5. (intransitive) To sigh; to flutter; to languish.
    • Alexander Pope
      The whispering breeze / Pants on the leaves, and dies upon the trees.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From pants

NounEdit

pant (plural pants)

  1. (fashion) A pair of pants (trousers or underpants).
  2. (used attributively as a modifier) Of or relating to pants.
    Pant leg
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Unknown

NounEdit

pant (plural pants)

  1. a public drinking fountain in Scotland and North-East England

ReferencesEdit

  • PMSA page with several examples
  • OED 2nd edition

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

pant m

  1. hinge

NorwegianEdit

NounEdit

pant n

  1. pawn (item sold to a pawn shop)


This Norwegian entry was created from the translations listed at pawn. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see pant in the Norwegian Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) December 2008


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Band

NounEdit

pȁnt m (Cyrillic spelling пант)

  1. hinge

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

pant n

  1. pawn (item sold to a pawn shop)


This Swedish entry was created from the translations listed at pawn. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see pant in the Swedish Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) August 2010