See also: Parole and parolē

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French parole (word, formal promise), from Old French parole, from Late Latin parabola (speech), from Ancient Greek παραβολή (parabolḗ). Doublet of parabola, parable, and palaver.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: pə-rōlʹ, IPA(key): /pəˈɹoːl/
    • (UK) IPA(key): [pə.ˈɹəʊɫ]
      • (file)
    • (US) IPA(key): [pə.ˈɹoʊɫ]
  • Rhymes: -əʊl
  • Hyphenation: pa‧role

NounEdit

parole (usually uncountable, plural paroles)

  1. (with on) Originally, one's oath or word of honour, given as a condition of release from custody; now specifically, describing the release of a former prisoner under certain conditions, especially the promise of good behaviour. [from 17th c.]
    He will be on parole for nearly two more years.
    He was released on parole.
  2. Conditional release of a prisoner (now especially before the end of a custodial sentence), or the term or state of such release; the system governing such releases. [from 17th c.]
    The defendant shall be sentenced to life without the possibility of parole.
  3. (now historical) A word of honor, especially given by a prisoner of war, to not engage in combat if released. [from 17th c.]
  4. (now rare) A watchword or code phrase; (military) a password given only to officers, distinguished from the countersign, which is given to all guards. [from 18th c.]
    • 1791, James Boswell, Life of Johnson, Oxford 2008, p. 1143:
      ‘Classical quotation is the parole of literary men all over the world.’
  5. (linguistics) Language in use, as opposed to language as a system. [from 20th c.]
  6. (US, immigration law) The permission for a foreigner who does not meet the technical requirements for a visa to be allowed to enter the U.S. on humanitarian grounds.
  7. (law) Alternative form of parol

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

VerbEdit

parole (third-person singular simple present paroles, present participle paroling, simple past and past participle paroled)

  1. (transitive, law) To release (a prisoner) on the understanding that s/he checks in regularly and obeys the law.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From paroli +‎ -e.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

parole

  1. verbally

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French parole, from Old French parole, inherited from Vulgar Latin *paraula, from Late Latin, from Latin parabola (comparison; later, speech), from Ancient Greek παραβολή (parabolḗ). Doublet of parabole. Compare with Italian parola, Spanish palabra and Portuguese palavra.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

parole f (plural paroles)

  1. utterance, expression (a unit of discourse, firstly oral)
  2. voice, spoken word
    • 1973, Leo Chiosso, Giancarlo Del Re, Michaële (lyrics), Gianni Ferrio (music), “Paroles… Paroles…”, performed by Dalida & Alain Delon:
      Que tu es belle / Parole, parole, parole / Que tu es belle / Parole, parole, parole, parole, parole / Encore des paroles que tu semes au vent
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  3. (in the plural) lyrics, words (of a song)
    paroles d'une chansonwords of a song, lyrics of a song
  4. promise, word
    il tient parolehe keeps his word
  5. floor; the right to speak in a legislative assembly
    le député a la parolethe member has the floor

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Haitian Creole: pawòl
  • Romanian: parolă

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

parole f pl

  1. plural of parola (words)
    Ci vogliono fatti e non parole.Action is needed, not words.
  2. (music) lyrics, words
    Synonym: testo
    Musica di Paolo, parole di LorenzoMusic by Paolo, lyrics by Lorenzo.

AnagramsEdit


LatvianEdit

 
Latvian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lv

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Parole, French parole.

NounEdit

parole f (5th declension)

  1. (military) password (identification word used in military operations or in secret, covert activities (e.g., by a secret service, in a revolutionary movement, etc.))
    prasīt parolito ask for the password
    pateikt parolito say, give the password
    parole iekļūšanai sapulcē bija: “uz satikšanos”the password to be admitted to the meeting was: “till we meet again”
    lai tiktu cauri visām trim apsardzības ķēdēm, vajadzēja zināt trīs dažādas parolesin order to get through all three defense lines, it was necessary to know three different passwords
  2. (computing) password (sequence of characters that gives access to a website)
    agrāk vispopulārākā parole bija “password” — previously the most popular password was “password”

DeclensionEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French parole.

NounEdit

parole f (plural paroles)

  1. word

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *paraula, from Late Latin, from Latin parabola (comparison; later, speech), from Ancient Greek παραβολή (parabolḗ).

NounEdit

parole f (oblique plural paroles, nominative singular parole, nominative plural paroles)

  1. word
    Synonym: mot
  2. (by extension, figuratively) the right to speak

DescendantsEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French parole.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

parole f

  1. (linguistics) parole

Usage notesEdit

Indeclined.

Further readingEdit

  • parole in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English parole. Doublet of palabra.

NounEdit

parole m (plural paroles)

  1. parole