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See also: Redden

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From red +‎ -en.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

redden (third-person singular simple present reddens, present participle reddening, simple past and past participle reddened)

  1. (intransitive) To become red or redder.
    • 1769, Plautus, Bonnell Thornton (translation), "The Captives", The Comedies of Plautus, T. Becket and P. A. De Hondt, page 341
      But I will make you blush; nay, I will make you redden all over.
    • 1794, William Hamilton, "Mithridates", Poems on Several Occasions, W. Gordon, page 258
      Ere this had redden'd with my odious blood.
    • 1997, Ted Hughes, Tales from Ovid, Faber & Faber, "Phaethon," lines 227-9, p. 32,
      When the sun-god saw that, and the reddening sky
      And the waning moon seeming to thaw
      He called the Hours to yoke the horses.
  2. (transitive) To make red or redder.
    • 1884, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Becket, Act I, Scene 4, [1]
      God redden your pale blood!
    • 1942, Wallace Stevens, "Country Words" in The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens, Knopf, 1971, p. 207,
      [] If the cloud that hangs
      Upon the heart and round the mind
      Cleared from the north and in that height
      The sun appeared and reddened great
      Belshazzar's brow, O, ruler, rude
      With rubies then, attend me now.
    • 1969, Wole Soyinka, The Bacchae of Euripides, Norton, 1974, p. 19,
      Then listen Thebes, nurse of Semele,
      Crown your hair with ivy
      Turn your fingers green with bryony
      Redden your walls with berries.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *redden, from Proto-Germanic *hradjaną.

VerbEdit

redden

  1. to save, to rescue

InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • redden (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

redden

  1. definite singular of redd