See also: Stow and -stow

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English stowe, from Old English stōw (a place, spot, locality, site), from Proto-Germanic *stōwō (a place, stowage), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand, place, put). Cognate with Old Frisian stō (place), Icelandic stó (fireplace), Dutch stouw (place). See also -stow.

NounEdit

stow (plural stows)

  1. (rare) A place, stead.
QuotationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English stowen, stawen, stewen, from Old English stōwian (to hold back, restrain), from Proto-Germanic *stōwōną, *stōwijaną (to stow, dam up), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand, place). Cognate with Dutch stuwen, stouwen (to stow), Low German stauen (to blin, halt, hinder), German stauen (to halt, hem in, stow, pack), Danish stuve (to stow), Swedish stuva (to stow).

VerbEdit

stow (third-person singular simple present stows, present participle stowing, simple past and past participle stowed) (transitive)

  1. To put something away in a compact and tidy manner, in its proper place, or in a suitable place.
  2. To store or pack something in a space-saving manner and over a long time.
    • 1922, James A. Cooper, Sheila of Big Wreck Cove:
      Yet everybody knows that a cargo properly stowed in a seaworthy craft reaches market in much the better condition than by rail, though perhaps it is some hours longer on the way.
  3. To arrange, pack, or fill something tightly or closely.
  4. To dispose, lodge, or hide somebody somewhere.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *stōwō (a place, stowage), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand, place, put).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stōw f (nominative plural stōwa)

  1. a place
    Ne sċoldest þū gān tō swā frēcenre stōwe.
    You shouldn't have gone to such a dangerous place.

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: stowe, stow

ScotsEdit

VerbEdit

stow

  1. (transitive) To cut off; to crop.