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GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested since the 15th century (binco). Probably a half learned word, from Latin vinculum.[1] Doublet of brinco and vínculo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vinco m (plural vincos)

  1. (dated) earring
    • 1448, X. Ferro Couselo (ed.), A vida e a fala dos devanceiros. Vigo: Galaxia, page 295:
      Iten, Johán Cortido, vesiño da çidade d'Ourense, et sua ama diseron, por lo dito juramento que feito avyan, que omes de Aluaro de Taboa[da] que lle lleuaron e tomaron do seu lugar de Casa Noua sete mantas e hun alfamare e tres sabaas de cama et hun pano de cabeça et quatro toucas et hun sodario et viinte e duas maranas de fiado delgado et seys bincos de prata et huas doas de viinte pares de doas et hun leitón, por que lle dauan dosentos mrs, et seys sacos et dous coitellos de mesa et çen mrs vellos en diñeiros, et tres capilejos et dous vntos, et dous legóos nouos et hun espeto et hua fouçe et hun caldeiro de cobre et hun manto vermello et hua sabaa, e que todo lle tomaran e que a apancaran e que a encheran de couçes
      Item, Xoán Cortido, neighbor of the city of Ourense, and his housekeeper, told, under the oath they'd done, that men of Álvaro de Taboada took from them and took in their place of Casa Nova: seven blankets, a quilt, three bedsheets, a cloth for the head, and four shawls and a shroud and twenty two skeins of thin yarn and six silver earrings and twenty pairs of beads and a piglet, for which they would give two hundred maravedis, and six bags and two table knives and a hundred old maravedis in coins, and three coifs and two lards, and two new hoes and a roasting skewer and a sickle and a copper cauldron and a red robe and a sheet, and that all this they took and that they beat her up and filled her with kicks
  2. (dated, music) triangle
  3. mark left by a folding or a binding
  4. nose ring (for pigs)
    Synonyms: brinco, narigón

ReferencesEdit

  • binco” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • vinco” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • vinco” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • vinco” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the form vinchio, from Late Latin vinclum, from Latin vinculum. Compare the borrowed doublet vincolo.

NounEdit

vinco m (plural vinchi) (poetic plural vinci)

  1. osier, wicker (flexible branch of willow)
  2. osier Salix viminalis
  3. (by extension) willow

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

vinco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of vincere

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *winkō, from Proto-Indo-European *wi-n-k-, nasal infix from *weyk- (to overcome), whence also Gothic 𐍅𐌴𐌹𐌷𐌰𐌽 (weihan, to fight) and Old Church Slavonic вѣкъ (věkŭ, age, long period of time).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vincō (present infinitive vincere, perfect active vīcī, supine victum); third conjugation

  1. I win, conquer, defeat

ConjugationEdit

   Conjugation of vincō (third conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present vincō vincis vincit vincimus vincitis vincunt
imperfect vincēbam vincēbās vincēbat vincēbāmus vincēbātis vincēbant
future vincam vincēs vincet vincēmus vincētis vincent
perfect vīcī vīcistī vīcit vīcimus vīcistis vīcērunt, vīcēre
pluperfect vīceram vīcerās vīcerat vīcerāmus vīcerātis vīcerant
future perfect vīcerō vīceris vīcerit vīcerimus vīceritis vīcerint
passive present vincor vinceris, vincere vincitur vincimur vinciminī vincuntur
imperfect vincēbar vincēbāris, vincēbāre vincēbātur vincēbāmur vincēbāminī vincēbantur
future vincar vincēris, vincēre vincētur vincēmur vincēminī vincentur
perfect victus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect victus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect victus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present vincam vincās vincat vincāmus vincātis vincant
imperfect vincerem vincerēs vinceret vincerēmus vincerētis vincerent
perfect vīcerim vīcerīs vīcerit vīcerīmus vīcerītis vīcerint
pluperfect vīcissem vīcissēs vīcisset vīcissēmus vīcissētis vīcissent
passive present vincar vincāris, vincāre vincātur vincāmur vincāminī vincantur
imperfect vincerer vincerēris, vincerēre vincerētur vincerēmur vincerēminī vincerentur
perfect victus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect victus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present vince vincite
future vincitō vincitō vincitōte vincuntō
passive present vincere vinciminī
future vincitor vincitor vincuntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives vincere vīcisse victūrum esse vincī victum esse victum īrī
participles vincēns victūrus victus vincendus, vincundus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
vincendī vincendō vincendum vincendō victum victū

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • vinco in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vinco in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • vinco in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to win a prize at the Olympian games: Olympia vincere (Ολύμπια νικαν)
    • to have self-control; to restrain oneself, master one's inclinations: animum vincere (Marcell. 3. 8)
    • to win a case: causā or iudicio vincere
    • to gain a victory, win a battle: proelio vincere
    • (ambiguous) in everything nature defies imitation: in omni re vincit imitationem veritas
    • (ambiguous) the necessaries of life: quae ad victum pertinent
    • (ambiguous) things indispensable to a life of comfort: res ad victum cultumque necessariae
    • (ambiguous) a livelihood: quae suppeditant ad victum (Off. 1. 4. 12)
    • (ambiguous) to earn a livelihood by something: victum aliqua re quaerere
    • (ambiguous) the majority were of the opinion..: sententia vincit (Liv. 2. 4. 3)
    • (ambiguous) to be defeated in fight, lose the battle: proelio vinci, superari, inferiorem, victum discedere



PortugueseEdit