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See also: Wale and walë

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

The noun is from Middle English wāle (planking, welt), from Old English walu (ridge, bank; rib, comb (of helmet); metal ridge on top of helmet; weal, mark of a blow), from Proto-Germanic *waluz (stick, root), from Proto-Indo-European *welʷ- (to turn, wind, roll). Akin to Low German wāle; Old Norse vala (knuckle). The verb is from late Middle English wālen, from the noun.

NounEdit

wale (plural wales)

  1. A ridge or low barrier.
  2. A raised rib in knit goods or fabric, especially corduroy. (As opposed to course).
    • 2008, Mary Lisa Gavenas, The Fairchild Encyclopedia of Menswear, page 99:
      The fabric may be further described according to the number of wales per inch: Corduroy known as fine wale, pin-wale, or needle wale has very thin wales (usually twelve or more per inch, i.e., the width of a pin), while wide wale corduroy has thicker wales (usually six or fewer per inch).
  3. The texture of a piece of fabric.
    • 1892, “Family Fashions and Fancies”, in Good Housekeeping, volume 14, page 85:
      Crepon cloths, with their heavy crape-like wale, are a noteworthy part of the season's importations.
  4. (nautical) A horizontal ridge or ledge on the outside planking of a wooden ship. (See gunwale, chainwale)
    • 1863, Andrew Murray, Ship-building in Iron and Wood, page 93:
      The strakes between the several ranges of ports, beginning from under the upper-deck ports of a three-decked ship in the royal navy, are called the channel wale, the middle wale, and the main wale.
  5. A horizontal timber used for supporting or retaining earth.
    • 1889 February 23, Architecture and Building: A Journal of Investment and Construction, volume 10, page 63:
      A few feet below the first wale another timber is inserted, likewise secured by struts.
  6. A timber bolted to a row of piles to secure them together and in position.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  7. A ridge on the outside of a horse collar.
    • 1976, Ralph Whitlock, Gentle giants: the past, present and future of the heavy horse, page 133:
      The wale is shaped to the size of the horse's neck, and then sewn together, with a flap, known as the 'barge', left free along one side. To this 'barge' the body of the collar is sewn.
  8. A ridge or streak produced on skin by a cane or whip.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
    • 1854, S. W. Koelle, African Native Literature, Or Proverbs, Tales, Fables and Historical in the Kanuri Or Bornu Language:
      When the rat had looked at the toad's whole body, and not seen any wale of a stick, he said to the toad, "Brother toad, I have looked at thy whole body, and not seen any wale of a stick: thou art right."
    • 2018, Seabury Quinn, The Dark Angel: The Complete Tales of Jules de Grandin, Volume Three:
      I ran to her, and when I reached her I saw across the white skin of her shoulders the distinct wale of a whip.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

wale (third-person singular simple present wales, present participle waling, simple past and past participle waled)

  1. To strike the skin in such a way as to produce a wale or welt.
    • 1832, Owen Felltham, Resolves, Divine, Moral, Political:
      Would suffer his lazy rider to bestride his patie: back, with his hands and whip to wale his flesh, and with his heels to dig into his hungry bowels?
    • 2002, Hal Rothman, Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century:
      When faced with an adulthood that offered few options, grinding poverty and marriage to a man who drank too much and came home to wale on his own family or...no beatings.
  2. To give a surface a texture of wales or welts.
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English wale, wal, from Old Norse val (choice), from Proto-Germanic *walą, *walō (desire, choice), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)welə- (to choose, wish). Akin to Old Norse velja (to choose), Old High German wala "choice" (German wählen "to choose"), Old English willan (to want). More at will.

NounEdit

wale (plural wales)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) Something selected as being the best, preference; choice.

VerbEdit

wale (third-person singular simple present wales, present participle waling, simple past and past participle waled)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) To choose, select.
Alternative formsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • wale at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • wale in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

AnagramsEdit


FulniôEdit

NounEdit

wale

  1. pig

ReferencesEdit

  • 2009 (originally 1968), Douglas Meland, Doris Meland, Fulniô (Yahthe) Syntax Structure: Preliminary Version, Associação Internacional de Linguística - SIL Brasil, page 19.

HawaiianEdit

NounEdit

wale

  1. phlegm
  2. saliva

ParticleEdit

wale

  1. Used to modify the preceding word only, just, alone; quite, very; simply, for free, without reason

Middle DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

wāle

  1. Alternative form of wel

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English wealh, from Proto-Germanic *walhaz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wale

  1. (rare) An outsider; a guest; one from an unfamiliar land.
  2. (rare) A thrall; a hireling.
Related termsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English walu, from Proto-Germanic *waluz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wale (plural wales)

  1. A wooden board used for creating the exterior of a vessel; planking.
  2. (rare) A welt; an injury created by use of a whip or a similar weapon.
  3. (rare) A lesion; a boil.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse val, from Proto-Germanic *walą, *walō.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wale

  1. A selection or possibility; a decision.
  2. (rare) A preference; something chosen due to its quality.
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wale

  1. amazing, of great quality or talent.
  2. pleasing, nice, enjoyable, benevolent
  3. strong, firm, strengthy
  4. (negatively) impactful, grievous, melancholy
  5. (rare) decided, resolved, picked.
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Old English wæl.

NounEdit

wale

  1. Alternative form of wal

Etymology 5Edit

From wale (selection).

VerbEdit

wale

  1. Alternative form of walen

Etymology 6Edit

From Old English hwæl.

NounEdit

wale

  1. Alternative form of whale

North FrisianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

wale

  1. (Mooring Dialect) to want

ConjugationEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English wal, wale, from Old Norse val (choice), from Proto-Germanic *walą, *walō (desire, choice), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)welə- (to choose, wish). Akin to Old Norse velja (to choose), Old High German wala "choice" (German wählen "to choose"), Old English willan (to want).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wale (plural wales)

  1. choice, selection

VerbEdit

wale (third-person singular present wales, present participle walin, past waled, past participle waled)

  1. to choose

SwahiliEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wale

  1. Wa class inflected form of -le.