See also: Hale, halé, hâlé, hâle, halë, and halę

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /heɪl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophone: hail
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hele, hæle, from Old English hǣlu, hǣl, from Proto-Germanic *hailį̄ (salvation, health), a noun-derivative of Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole, healthy). Cognate with Scots haill, hale (health), German Heil (salvation, well-being).

NounEdit

hale (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Health, welfare.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Northern Middle English hal, hale, variants of hole (healthy; safe; whole) (whence whole), from Middle English hāl, from Proto-West Germanic *hail, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole; entire; healthy). See whole for more.

AdjectiveEdit

hale (comparative haler, superlative halest)

  1. (dated) Sound, entire, healthy; robust, not impaired.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, On the Death of Dr. Swift
      Last year we thought him strong and hale.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      "Good morrow to thee, jolly fellow," quoth Robin, "thou seemest happy this merry morn."
      "Ay, that am I," quoth the jolly Butcher, "and why should I not be so? Am I not hale in wind and limb? Have I not the bonniest lass in all Nottinghamshire? And lastly, am I not to be married to her on Thursday next in sweet Locksley Town?"
Usage notesEdit
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English halen, from Anglo-Norman haler, from Old Dutch *halon (compare Dutch halen), from Proto-Germanic *halōną (compare Old English ġeholian, West Frisian helje, German holen), from Proto-Indo-European *kelh₁- (to lift) (compare Latin ex-cellō (to surpass), Tocharian B käly- (to stand, stay), Albanian qell (to halt, hold up, carry), Lithuanian kélti (to raise up), Ancient Greek κελέοντες (keléontes, upright beam on a loom)). Doublet of haul.

VerbEdit

hale (third-person singular simple present hales, present participle haling, simple past and past participle haled)

  1. To drag or pull, especially forcibly.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 6, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      For I had beene vilely hurried and haled by those poore men, which had taken the paines to carry me upon their armes a long and wearysome way, and to say truth, they had all beene wearied twice or thrice over, and were faine to shift severall times.
    • 1636, John Denham, “The Destruction of Troy, an Essay on the Second Book of Virgil’s Æneis. Written in the Year 1636.”, in Poems and Translations; with the Sophy, a Tragedy, 5th edition, London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, [], published 1709, OCLC 968557217, page 38:
      A ſpacious Breach we make, and Troy’s proud Wall / Built by the Gods, by our own hands doth fall; / Thus, all their help to their own Ruin give, / Some draw with Cords, and ſome the Monſter drive / With Rolls and Leavers, thus our Works it climbs, / Big with our Fate, the Youth with Songs and Rhimes, / Some dance, ſome hale the Rope; at laſt let down / It enters with a thund’ring Noiſe the Town.
    • 1820, Percy Bysshe Shelley, “Prometheus Unbound”, in Prometheus Unbound [], London: C[harles] and J[ames] Ollier [], OCLC 36924440, Act I, page 21:
      The wingless, crawling hours, one among whom / —As some dark Priest hales the reluctant victim— / Shall drag thee, cruel King, to kiss the blood / From these pale feet, which then might trample thee / If they disdained not such a prostrate slave.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, “Walking to the Mail”, in Poems. [...] In Two Volumes, volume II, London: Edward Moxon, [], OCLC 1008064829, page 51:
      By night we dragg'd her to the college tower / From her warm bed, and up the corkscrew stair / With hand and rope we haled the groaning sow, / And on the leads we kept her till she pigg'd.
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall [pseudonym; Arthur Hammond Marshall], “A Court Ball”, in The Squire’s Daughter, New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead and Company, published 1919, OCLC 491297620, page 9:
      He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance. [...] But she said she must go back, and when they joined the crowd again her partner was haled off with a frightened look to the royal circle, [...]
    • 1912, Robert W[illiam] Service, “The Wanderlust”, in Rhymes of a Rolling Stone, Toronto, Ont.: William Briggs, OCLC 17429753, stanza 1, page 123:
      The Wanderlust has lured me to the seven lonely seas, / Has dumped me on the tailing-piles of dearth; / The Wanderlust has haled me from the morris chairs of ease, / Has hurled me to the ends of all the earth.
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial, 2007, page 262:
      They will hale the King to Paris, and have him under their eye.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Alemannic GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German *halēn. Compare Icelandic hallur (steep), from Old Norse hallr (rock, stone), from Proto-Germanic *halluz (rock, stone; rockface, cliff).

VerbEdit

hale

  1. (Uri) to be steep

ReferencesEdit


Central FranconianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • halde (few dialects, including Kölsch)

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German *haldan, northern variant of haltan.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hale (third-person singular present hält, past tense heelt or hielt, past participle jehale or gehale or gehal)

  1. (most dialects) to hold

Usage notesEdit

  • The forms heelt; jehale are Ripuarian, whereas all given forms except jehale occur in Moselle Franconian.

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hali.

NounEdit

hale c (singular definite halen, plural indefinite haler)

  1. tail, brush, scut
  2. bottom, fanny
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From late Old Norse hala, from Middle Low German halen.

VerbEdit

hale (imperative hal, infinitive at hale, present tense haler, past tense halede, perfect tense har halet)

  1. haul, heave, pull
  2. drag

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of halen

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  5. second-person singular imperative of haler

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of halar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of halar

HawaiianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *fale, from Proto-Central Pacific *vale, from Proto-Oceanic *pale, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈha.le/, [ˈhɐle]

NounEdit

hale

  1. house, building
  2. institution
  3. lodge
  4. station, hall

VerbEdit

hale

  1. to have a house

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “hale” in the Hawaiian Dictionary, Revised and Enlarged Edition, University of Hawaii Press, 1986

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From a form of Old English halh without the final -h; compare hāle (dative). Doublet of halgh (attested only in placenames), whence English haugh.

NounEdit

hale (plural hales)

  1. corner, nook, cranny, hiding place
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: hale

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Anglo-Norman hale, halle, from Latin halla (house, dwelling; court; palace; market hall), from Frankish *hallu, from Proto-Germanic *hallō (hall). Doublet of halle (hall).

NounEdit

hale (plural hales)

  1. hale (temporary structure for housing, entertaining, eating meals, etc.)
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. Alternative form of haylen (to hail)

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

hale (plural hales)

  1. Alternative form of halle (hall)

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

hale (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of hayle (hail)

Etymology 6Edit

AdjectiveEdit

hale

  1. Alternative form of hole (healthy, whole)

Etymology 7Edit

AdjectiveEdit

hale

  1. Alternative form of holy (holy)

NormanEdit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  5. second-person singular imperative of haler

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hali.

NounEdit

hale m (definite singular halen, indefinite plural haler, definite plural halene)

  1. a tail (of an animal, aircraft, comet etc.)
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From late Old Norse hala, from Middle Low German halen.

VerbEdit

hale (present tense haler, past tense halte, past participle halt)

  1. to haul, heave, pull
  2. to drag

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hali.

NounEdit

hale m (definite singular halen, indefinite plural halar, definite plural halane)

  1. a tail (of an animal, aircraft, comet etc.)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hale f

  1. nominative plural of hala
  2. accusative plural of hala
  3. vocative plural of hala

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of halar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of halar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of halar.