See also: Hale, halé, halę, and hâlé

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English hǣlu, hǣl, from a noun-derivative of Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole, healthy).

NounEdit

hale (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Health, welfare.
    • Spenser
      All heedless of his dearest hale.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Representing a Northern dialectal form of Old English hāl (whole), perhaps influenced by Old Norse heill (Webster's suggests ‘partly from Old English, partly from Old Norse’), both from Proto-Germanic *hailaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kóh₂ilus (healthy, whole). Compare whole, hail (adjective).

AdjectiveEdit

hale (comparative haler, superlative halest)

  1. Sound, entire, healthy; robust, not impaired.
    • Jonathan Swift
      Last year we thought him strong and hale.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      "Good morrow to thee, jolly fellow," quoth Robin, "thou seemest happy this merry morn."
      "Ay, that am I," quoth the jolly Butcher, "and why should I not be so? Am I not hale in wind and limb? Have I not the bonniest lass in all Nottinghamshire? And lastly, am I not to be married to her on Thursday next in sweet Locksley Town?"
AntonymsEdit
Usage notesEdit
  • Now rather uncommon, except in the stock phrase "hale and hearty".
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English halen, from Anglo-Norman haler, from Old Dutch *halon (compare Dutch halen), from Proto-Germanic *halōną (compare Old English geholian, West Frisian helje, German holen), from Proto-Indo-European *kelh₁- ‘to lift’ (compare Latin excellere ‘to surpass’, Tocharian B käly- ‘to stand, stay’, Albanian qell (to halt, hold up, carry), Lithuanian kélti ‘to raise up’, Ancient Greek κελέοντες (keléontes) ‘upright beam on a loom’). Doublet of haul.

VerbEdit

hale (third-person singular simple present hales, present participle haling, simple past and past participle haled)

  1. To drag, pull, especially forcibly.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.6:
      For I had beene vilely hurried and haled by those poore men, which had taken the paines to carry me upon their armes a long and wearysome way, and to say truth, they had all beene wearied twice or thrice over, and were faine to shift severall times.
    • 1820, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Prometheus Unbound, act 1
      The wingless, crawling hours, one among whom
      As some dark Priest hales the reluctant victim
      Shall drag thee, cruel King, to kiss the blood
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial 2007, p. 262:
      They will hale the King to Paris, and have him under their eye.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hali.

NounEdit

hale c (singular definite halen, plural indefinite haler)

  1. tail, brush, scut
  2. bottom, fanny
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From late Old Norse hala, from Middle Low German halen.

VerbEdit

hale (imperative hal, infinitive at hale, present tense haler, past tense halede, past participle har halet)

  1. haul, heave, pull
  2. drag

External linksEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. singular present subjunctive of halen

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  5. second-person singular imperative of haler

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of halar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of halar

HawaiianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *fale, from Proto-Oceanic *pale, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay.

NounEdit

hale

  1. house, building
  2. institution
  3. lodge
  4. station, hall
  5. host, hospitable person

JèrriaisEdit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haler
  5. second-person singular imperative of haler

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hale f

  1. nominative plural of hala
  2. accusative plural of hala
  3. vocative plural of hala

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

hale

  1. third-person singular imperative of halar
Last modified on 1 April 2014, at 16:50