Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 22:45
See also: DIN

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English dyne, from Proto-Germanic *duniz. Akin to Old Norse dynr, Sanskrit ध्वनति (dhvanati, to make a noise, to roar).

NounEdit

din (plural dins)

  1. A loud noise; a cacophony or loud commotion.
    • So many faces Clive had not seen by daylight, and looking terrible, like cadavers jerked upright to welcome the newly dead. Invigorated by this jolt of misanthropy, he moved sleekly through the din - Amsterdam by Ian McEwen
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 7, The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      The patter of feet, and clatter of strap and swivel, seemed to swell into a bewildering din, but they were almost upon the fielato offices, where the carretera entered the town, before a rifle flashed.
    • Shakespeare
      Think you a little din can daunt mine ears?
    • Sir Walter Scott
      He knew the battle's din afar.
    • Tennyson
      the dust and din and steam of town
QuotationsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English dynnan, from Proto-Germanic *dunją, from the same stem as Etymology 1, above.

VerbEdit

din (third-person singular simple present dins, present participle dinning, simple past and past participle dinned)

  1. (obsolete) To be filled with sound; to resound.
  2. (transitive) To assail with loud noise.
  3. (transitive) To repeat continuously, as though to the point of deafening or exhausting somebody.
    • Jonathan Swift
      This hath been often dinned in my ears.
    2003, His mother had dinned The Whole Duty of Man into him in early childhood — Roy Porter, Flesh in the Age of Reason (Penguin 2004, p. 183)
  4. (intransitive) To make a din.

AnagramsEdit


AzeriEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic дин
Roman din
Perso-Arabic دین

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Arabic دين (dīn).

NounEdit

din (definite accusative dini, plural dinlər)

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

DeclensionEdit


BretonEdit

Prepositional pronounEdit

din

  1. first-person singular form of da

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þínn, from Proto-Germanic *þīnaz (your).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /diːn/, [d̥iːˀn]

PronounEdit

din (neuter dit, plural dine)

  1. your, thy (singular; one owner)
  2. yours, thine (singular; one owner)

See alsoEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

din

  1. third-person plural present indicative of dicir

IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay din, from Arabic دين (dīn).

NounEdit

din

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

KiputEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-North Sarawak *daqan, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *daqan.

NounEdit

din

  1. branch

LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Hebrew דִּין (din).

NounEdit

din m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling דין)

  1. religious law

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

din

  1. rafsi of jdini.

MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Arabic دين (dīn).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

din

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

SynonymsEdit


MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic ذي (ḏī), plus accusative case ending اً (-an)

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

din f

  1. feminine form of dan

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þinn.

PronounEdit

din m (feminine di, neuter ditt, plural dine)

  1. your, yours

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þinn.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

din m (feminine di, neuter ditt, plural dine)

  1. your, yours

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit


OccitanEdit

PrepositionEdit

din

  1. inside; alternative form of dins.

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *þīnaz, whence also Old English þīn, Old Norse þínn.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

dīn

  1. your (singular)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From de + în.

PronunciationEdit

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

PrepositionEdit

din (+accusative)

  1. on, on top of
  2. from, out of

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish þīn, from Old Norse þínn, from Proto-Germanic *þīnaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

din

  1. definite singular of di

PronounEdit

din c (neuter ditt, plural dina)

  1. your, yours; of one thing in the common gender (speaking to one person)

DeclensionEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Arabic دين (dīn).

NounEdit

din (definite accusative dini, plural dinler)

  1. (religion) System of beliefs dealing with soul, deity or life after death.

Derived termsEdit

DeclensionEdit


UzbekEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic дин
Roman din
Perso-Arabic ‍‍

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Arabic دين (dīn).

NounEdit

din (plural dinlar)

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from German Ding.

NounEdit

din (plural dins)

  1. thing

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

NounEdit

din f

  1. Mutated form of tin.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tin din nhin thin