See also: Per, PER, për, and per-

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin per (through, during), from Proto-Indo-European *per.

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. for each
    Admission is £10 per person.
  2. to each, in each (used in expressing ratios of units)
    miles per gallon
    beats per minute
  3. (medicine) via (the), by (the), through (the) (followed by Latin name for an orifice)
    Introduce the endoscope per nasum.
    The medication is to be administered per os.
  4. in accordance with
    I parked my car at the curb per your request.
Usage notesEdit
  • The preposition per is typically followed by a singular noun phrase with no determiner.
    Take one pill per day. not Take one pill per a day.
  • It is sometimes followed by plural noun phrases, almost always determined by 100, 1,000, 100,000, etc.
    The abortion rate in the U.S. has dropped since 1980 from nearly 30 per 1,000 women of childbearing age to less than 20.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

shortening of person, coined by Marge Piercy in Woman on the Edge of Time (1979)

PronounEdit

per (third-person singular, gender-neutral, reflexive perself)

  1. (neologism) they (singular). Gender-neutral third-person singular subject pronoun, coordinate with gendered pronouns he and she.
    • 1997 April 22, "Anthony and Joy Hilbert" (username), "ASB: Info PDQ please re local group rules", in alt.sex.bondage, Usenet:
      This is the same place the Houghtons came from? The place where someone we interacted with thought of going into law as a profession, decided per couldn't because per was a bdsmer, and most of the USAmerican bdsmers per was discussing it with agreed with per?
  2. (neologism) them (singular) Gender-neutral third-person singular object pronoun, grammatically equivalent to the gendered him and her.
    • 1997 April 22, "Anthony and Joy Hilbert" (username), "ASB: Info PDQ please re local group rules", in alt.sex.bondage, Usenet:
      This is the same place the Houghtons came from? The place where someone we interacted with thought of going into law as a profession, decided per couldn't because per was a bdsmer, and most of the USAmerican bdsmers per was discussing it with agreed with per?
    • 1998, Katherine Phelps, “Odysseus, She”, Storytronics:
      "Kalypso!" I call out as phe disappears on the horizon. I did not know it, but I loved per.
    • 2006 November 15, Richard Ekins, Dave King, The transgender phenomenon, Sage Publications, LCC HQ77.9.E55 2006, ISBN 9780761971634, LCCN 2006920988, page 160:
      Whereas Christie had flirted with a lesbian identity prior to surgery, following surgery Christie found perself able to pursue per attraction to men, provided they related to per as a non-gendered person.
Derived termsEdit
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

per

  1. (neologism) Belonging to per, their (singular). Gender-neutral third-person singular possessive adjective, coordinate with gendered his and her.
    • 2006, Richard Ekins, Dave King, The transgender phenomenon, Sage Publications, LCC HQ77.9.E55 2006, ISBN 9780761971634, LCCN 2006920988, page 160:
      Whereas Christie had flirted with a lesbian identity prior to surgery, following surgery Christie found perself able to pursue per attraction to men, provided they related to per as a non-gendered person.
Derived termsEdit
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit

See alsoEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin pilus. Compare Daco-Romanian păr.

NounEdit

per

  1. hair
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin pirus. Compare Daco-Romanian păr.

NounEdit

per

  1. pear tree
Related termsEdit

AsturianEdit

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. by means of, by way of, by
  2. for
    per trés díes
    for three days
  3. through

Derived termsEdit


BretonEdit

NounEdit

per f (singulative perenn)

  1. pears

CatalanEdit

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. Through, via: used in indicating the medium through which passage occurs.
  2. At, during, in: used in indicating the time at which an event occurs.
  3. During, for: used in indicating the duration of time for which an event occurs.
  4. Because, because of: used in indicating the reason an action was undertaken.
  5. (when followed by a verbal noun) Used in indicating the activity one intends to do because of an action.
    El meu germà anirà a Tahití per vacar a la platja.
    My brother will go to Tahiti (in order) to vacation on the beach.
  6. By: used in indicating the agent responsible for an action.
  7. For each; for every.
  8. A, for, per: used in indicating a rate of exchange.

Usage notesEdit

  • When the preposition per is followed by a masculine definite article, el (sg) or els (pl), it is contracted with it to the forms pel (sg) or pels (pl) respectively. If el would be elided to the form l’ becuse it is before a word beginning with a vowel, the elision to per l’ takes precedence over contracting to pel.

Derived termsEdit


CornishEdit

NounEdit

per f (singulative peren)

  1. pears

DanishEdit

PrepositionEdit

per (abbreviated pr.)

  1. For each; for every
    Motoren roterer 1000 gange per minut.
    The engine rotates 1000 times per minute.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. For each; for every; per
    De motor draait 1000 toeren per minuut.
    The engine goes 1000 revolutions per minute.
  2. by means of
    Kom je per auto of per spoor?
    Are you coming by car or by rail?

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. by means of, with
    Li skribis per plumo.
    He wrote with a pen.

See alsoEdit


HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

per (plural perek)

  1. action, suit, lawsuit

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. with, by, by means of
    Ilu batis me per bastono.
    He beat me with a stick.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin per.[1]

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. for
  2. through
  3. in or on
  4. by
  5. with
  6. as

Usage notesEdit

When followed by a definite article, per may optionally be combined with the article to give the following combined forms (old forms, very rarely used):

Per + article Combined form
per + il pel
per + lo pello
per + l' pell'
per + i pei
per + gli pegli
per + la pella
per + le pelle

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Angelo Prati, "Vocabolario Etimologico Italiano", Torino, 1951

LadinEdit

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. for
  2. through
  3. in or on
  4. by
  5. with
  6. as

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *peri. Cognates include Ancient Greek περί (peri), Sanskrit परि (pári), Lithuanian per and English for.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. (with accusative) through, by means of
  2. (with accusative) during

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


LithuanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *peri. Cognates include Ancient Greek περί (perí), परि (pári), Latin per and English for.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

per (with accusative)

  1. through
  2. during

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

per

  1. rafsi of perli.

NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin per (related to native for).

PrepositionEdit

per (abbreviated pr.)

  1. For each, for every, per.
    Motoren roterer 1000 ganger per minutt. — The engine rotates 1000 times per minute.
    per porsjonfor each portion
    per dagper day

SynonymsEdit

  • (for each): for hver, i, om

NovialEdit

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. by means of

RomaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Armenian փոր (pʿor, belly, abdomen).

NounEdit

per f (plural per)

  1. abdomen, belly

Derived termsEdit

  • peréskero

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

per

  1. For each; for every
    Motorn roterar 1000 varv per minut.
    The engine goes 1000 revolutions per minute.
Last modified on 9 April 2014, at 08:02