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BashkirEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *ạ̄č (hungry, hunger).

Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰀𐰲(āč), Kazakh аш (), Kyrgyz ач (), Uzbek och, Turkish (hungry), Yakut аас (aas, hungry), etc.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ɑs]
  • Hyphenation: ас (one syllable)

AdjectiveEdit

ас (as)

  1. hungry
    Астың хәлен туҡ белмәй.
    Astïñ xälen tuq belmäy.
    The well-fed does not know the condition of the hungry.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


ChuvashEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *es (memory, mind).

NounEdit

ас (as)

  1. memory

KhantyEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ас (as)

  1. (Kazym) river

SynonymsEdit


Komi-PermyakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *iće. Cognates include Estonian ise and Finnish itse.

AdjectiveEdit

ас (as)

  1. own

Komi-ZyrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *iće. Cognates include Estonian ise and Finnish itse.

AdjectiveEdit

ас (as)

  1. own

MacedonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin as.

NounEdit

ас (asm (plural асови)

  1. ace

RussianEdit

 
Russian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ru

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French as.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [as]
  • (file)

NounEdit

ас (asm anim (genitive а́са, nominative plural а́сы, genitive plural а́сов)

  1. ace (expert)

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German As, from Latin as (as, copper coin).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

а̏с m (Latin spelling ȁs)

  1. (card games, sports) ace

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit

Playing cards in Serbo-Croatian · играће карте (layout · text)
             
ас, кес двојка, двица тројка, трица четворка, четвртица петица шестица седмица
             
осмица деветка, деветица десетка, десетица дечко, пуб, жандар, фант краљица, дама краљ џокер

UdmurtEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *iće. Cognates include Estonian ise and Finnish itse.

AdjectiveEdit

ас (as)

  1. own