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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hungry, from Old English hungriġ, hungreġ (hungry, famishing; meager), from Proto-Germanic *hungragaz (hungry), equivalent to hunger +‎ -y. Cognate with Dutch hongerig (hungry), German hungrig (hungry), Swedish hungrig (hungry).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhʌŋ.ɡɹi/
  • (file)
  • Homophone: Hungary (in some accents)

AdjectiveEdit

hungry (comparative hungrier, superlative hungriest)

  1. Affected by hunger; desiring of food; having a physical need for food.
    My kids go to bed hungry every night because I haven't got any money.
  2. (figuratively) Eager, having an avid desire (‘appetite’) for something.
  3. Not rich or fertile; poor; barren; starved.
    a hungry soil
    • c. 1607, William Shakespeare, Coriolanus, Act V, Scene 3,[3]
      [] What is this?
      Your knees to me? to your corrected son?
      Then let the pebbles on the hungry beach
      Fillip the stars []

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English hungriġ, from Proto-Germanic *hungragaz; equivalent to hunger +‎ -y.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhunɡriː/, [ˈhuŋɡriː]

AdjectiveEdit

hungry

  1. Hungry or starving; afflicted by hunger or starvation.
  2. Voracious; having a great desire or compulsion to eat.
  3. Haggard, scrawny; shriveled due to hunger or starvation.
  4. (rare) Due to hunger; because of one's appetite.
  5. (rare) Desirous; wanting something to a great degree.
  6. (rare) Causing or producing hunger.
  7. (rare) Of earth; not productive.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

hungry

  1. Those who are hungry, starving, or of little means.

ReferencesEdit