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TranslingualEdit

 
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DescriptionEdit

An S-shape with one or two vertical lines crossing it completely.

EtymologyEdit

$ appears to have evolved ca 1775 in the United States from a common abbreviation for pesos, also known as piastres or pieces of eight, a P/raised-S ligature PS that passed through a stage resembling ֆ.[1] It was used in the US before the adoption of the dollar in 1785.[2]

NounEdit

$

  1. Abbreviation of money.
  2. (used everywhere except in the Philippines) Abbreviation of peso.
  3. Abbreviation of dollar.
    • 1977, advertisement page in Uncanny X-Men, #106, page 8
      Fool all your friends. You'll get a Million[sic] $$$ worth of laughs with these exact reproductions of old U. S. Gold Banknotes (1840).
  4. Abbreviation of escudo.

LetterEdit

$

  1. A substitute for the letter S, used as a symbol of money or (perceived) greedy business practices.
    "Micro$oft Window$"
    • 2015, "Pixtopia", season 1, episode 6b of Star vs. the Forces of Evil
      [the text below is written on-screen in large letters, once Marco reveals his "emergency cash stash"]
      Marco'$ emergency ca$h $ta$h

SymbolEdit

$

  1. (Should we delete(+) this sense?) (programming) Prefix indicating a variable in some languages, like Perl, PHP, shell scripts.
  2. (Should we delete(+) this sense?) (programming) Suffix indicating a string in BASIC.
  3. (Should we delete(+) this sense?) (programming) Prefix indicating a hexadecimal constant in Pascal and assembly languages.
    • 1988, Michael A. Miller, The 68000 Microprocessor, page 45:
      On paper, simply add the carry to the next addition; that is, $B2 + $9C + 1. That's fine for paper, but how is it done by computer?
  4. (Should we delete(+) this sense?) (computing) End of line or end of input.
  5. (Should we delete(+) this sense?) (regular expressions) Matches the end position within the string. Compare ^, which matches the start position within the string.
    ^example$

Derived termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

When used as a currency symbol, $ precedes the number it qualifies (in English), despite being pronounced second. For example, “$1” is read as “one dollar” not “dollar one” unlike the usage in languages such as French or German: “1 $”, “2,50 $”. When used for the Portuguese escudo, $ is placed between the escudos & centavos, 2$50.

See alsoEdit

Currency signs

  • ؋ – afghani
  • ฿ – baht
  • – bitcoin
  • ¢ – cent
  • – colón
  • – cedi
  • $ – dollar
  • – dong
  • ֏ - dram
  • – euro
  • ƒ – florin (also called guilder and gulden)
  • – guarani
  • – lari
  • – hryvnia
  • – kip
  • – lira (in Turkey)
  • – manat
  • – mill
  • – naira
  • – peso (in the Philippines)
  • £ – pound
  • – riyal
  • – riel
  • ރ – rufiyaa
  • – ruble
  • – rupee
  • – rupee
  • – Indian rupee
  • or taka (in Bangladesh)
  • – rupee (in Gujarat)
  • – new sheqel
  • – tenge
  • – tugrik
  • – won
  • ¥ – yen

Formerly used currency signs

  • – austral
  • – ECU (European Currency Unit)
  • – cruzeiro
  • – drachma
  • – franc
  • – lira
  • – Livres Tournois
  • – mark
  • – peseta
  • – pfennig
  • – spesmilo


ReferencesEdit