See also: 𢎵
U+5F17, 弗
CJK UNIFIED IDEOGRAPH-5F17

[U+5F16]
CJK Unified Ideographs
[U+5F18]

TranslingualEdit

Han characterEdit

(radical 57, +2, 5 strokes, cangjie input 中中弓 (LLN), four-corner 55027, composition ⿻⿰丿)

Derived charactersEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • KangXi: page 356, character 16
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 9708
  • Dae Jaweon: page 673, character 1
  • Hanyu Da Zidian (first edition): volume 2, page 990, character 9
  • Unihan data for U+5F17

ChineseEdit

simp. and trad.

Glyph originEdit

Historical forms of the character
Shang Western Zhou
Oracle bone script Bronze inscriptions
   

Pictogram (象形) – two arrows, tied together to be straightened.

Later borrowed phonetically to mean “no”. The derivative (OC *pʰɯd) stands for the original word.

Etymology 1Edit

not (verb) him/her/it
Fusion of (OC *pɯ, *pɯʔ, *pɯ', “not”) with (OC *tjɯ, “third-person pronoun”) (Schuessler, 2007). See etymology of for more.

PronunciationEdit



Rime
Character
Reading # 1/1
Initial () (1)
Final () (60)
Tone (調) Checked (Ø)
Openness (開合) Closed
Division () III
Fanqie
Reconstructions
Zhengzhang
Shangfang
/pɨut̚/
Pan
Wuyun
/piut̚/
Shao
Rongfen
/piuət̚/
Edwin
Pulleyblank
/put̚/
Li
Rong
/piuət̚/
Wang
Li
/pĭuət̚/
Bernard
Karlgren
/pi̯uət̚/
Expected
Mandarin
Reflex
fu
BaxterSagart system 1.1 (2014)
Character
Reading # 1/3 2/3 3/3
Modern
Beijing
(Pinyin)
Middle
Chinese
‹ pjut › ‹ pjut › ‹ pjut ›
Old
Chinese
/*p[u]t/ /*put/ /*put/
English (negation) gust of wind writing brush (pron. in Yān 燕, ap. Shuōwén, E. Hàn)

Notes for Old Chinese notations in the Baxter–Sagart system:

* Parentheses "()" indicate uncertain presence;
* Square brackets "[]" indicate uncertain identity, e.g. *[t] as coda may in fact be *-t or *-p;
* Angle brackets "<>" indicate infix;
* Hyphen "-" indicates morpheme boundary;

* Period "." indicates syllable boundary.
Zhengzhang system (2003)
Character
Reading # 1/1
No. 3313
Phonetic
component
Rime
group
Rime
subdivision
1
Corresponding
MC rime
Old
Chinese
/*pɯd/

DefinitionsEdit

  1. (Classical Chinese or dialectal) not.
SynonymsEdit
Usage notesEdit
  • In modern Chinese, this character is almost entirely used for phonetic translations. The character mainly represents the phoneme /f/ in word-final and preconsonantal positions.
  • The characters () and (fǒu) are far more commonly used to mean “no”.

CompoundsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

For pronunciation and definitions of – see (“to cost; to spend; to expend; to consume; to use; to exhaust; etc.”).
(This character, , is the second-round simplified form of .)
Notes:

JapaneseEdit

 
Japanese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ja

KanjiEdit

(uncommon “Hyōgai” kanji)

  1. fluorine
  2. the dollar sign ($)

ReadingsEdit

  • Go-on: ほち (hochi)
  • Kan-on: ふつ (futsu)
  • Kun: ドル (doru, ); (zu, )

Etymology 1Edit

 
Japanese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ja
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
(futsu): a sample of chilled liquid fluorine.
Kanji in this term
ふつ
Hyōgaiji
kan’on

Originally borrowed from Middle Chinese (*pjut), meaning either “not” or “a gust of wind”. Apparently later repurposed during the later Edo period for its phonetic value in translating the Dutch fluor (fluorine).

PronunciationEdit

AffixEdit

(ふつ) (futsu

  1. (chemistry, chemical elements) fluorine, fluoride
Derived termsEdit
Usage notesEdit

Seldom used. In chemistry contexts, almost always spelled in katakana as フツ, appearing in most compounds as フッ.

Etymology 2Edit

 
Japanese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ja
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
(doru): evolution of the dollar symbol for both the United States and (now obsolete) Spanish dollar.
Kanji in this term
どる
Hyōgaiji
kun’yomi

Repurposed for its visual similarity to the dollar symbol $. This reading is ultimately borrowed from Dutch dollar.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

SymbolEdit

(ドル) (doru

  1. a dollar
Usage notesEdit

Occasionally seen, but more often encountered in the katakana spelling of ドル.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1988, 国語大辞典(新装版) (Kokugo Dai Jiten, Revised Edition) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan
  2. 2.0 2.1 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, →ISBN

KoreanEdit

HanjaEdit

(eumhun 아닐 (anil bul))

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
  2. Repurposed for its visual similarity to the dollar symbol $.[1]

ReferencesEdit


VietnameseEdit

Han characterEdit

(phất)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.