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See also: Ester, éster, and Estèr

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From German Ester, perhaps a contraction or abstraction of Essigäther (ethyl acetate), from Essig (vinegar) (from Latin acetum) and Äther (ether). See ether for more.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ester (plural esters)

  1. (organic chemistry) A compound most often formed by the condensation of an alcohol and an acid, with elimination of water, which contains the functional group carbon-oxygen double bond joined via carbon to another oxygen atom.
    • 1991, Malcolm B. Hale et al., “New Products and Markets for Menhaden, Brevoortia spp.”, in Marine Fisheries Review, volume 53, number 4, page 47:
      To produce a test material containing at least 75 percent omega-3 polyunsaturates, the menhaden triglycerides are transesterified to produce fatty acid ethyl esters. The esters are reacted with urea dissolved in hot ethanol and the solution is cooled overnight.
    • 1991, W. F. Kean, C. J. L. Lock, and H. E. Howard-Lock, “Chirality in antirheumatic drugs”, in The Lancet, volume 338, DOI:10.1016/0140-6736(91)92382-C, page 1567:
      The thiol-coenzyme-A ester formed by R-arylpropionic acid can bind to triglyceride to form a “hybrid” triglyceride: such hybrid triglycerides can cause alteration of fatty-acid metabolism and membrane function, and a lipophilic triglyceride–propionic-acid hybrid would be able to cross lipid membranes such as the blood–brain barrier.
    • 1996, Steven Ashley, “Composite car structures pass the crash test”, in Mechanical Engineering[1], volume 118, number 12, page 60:
      The effort’s primary material systems are vinyl esters and polyurethanes, reinforced with inexpensive chopped-glass rovings. Automated glass-fiber preforming processes and high-rate molding procedures are being studied in an effort to reduce cycle times and production costs substantially.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

NounEdit

ester f (singulative estren)

  1. oysters

CzechEdit

NounEdit

ester m

  1. ester

Further readingEdit

  • ester in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ester in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

ester c (singular definite esteren, plural indefinite estere)

  1. Estonian
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From German Ester

NounEdit

ester c (singular definite esteren, plural indefinite estere)

  1. ester
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Ester.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛs.tər/
  • (file)

NounEdit

ester m (plural esters, diminutive estertje n)

  1. (organic chemistry) ester

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

ester (genitive estri, partitive estrit)

  1. (organic chemistry) ester

DeclensionEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French ester, from Vulgar Latin *estō, from Classical Latin stō (cf. also the juridical Medieval Latin senses), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ester

  1. (law, rare) to appear
  2. (archaic) to be
ConjugationEdit

Only used in the infinitive, present participle estant and past participle esté.

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From German Essig-Äther (acetic acid ethyl ester).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ester m (plural esters)

  1. (organic chemistry) ester

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


LadinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin exterus, from exter.

AdjectiveEdit

ester m (feminine singular estera, masculine plural esters, feminine plural esteres)

  1. foreign, overseas

Etymology 2Edit

From Vulgar Latin *essere, from Latin esse, present active infinitive of sum.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

ester

  1. to be
ConjugationEdit
  • Ladin conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ēaster.

NounEdit

ester (plural esters)

  1. Easter (Christian holiday)
    • c. 1280, “Vita sancti Brendani, Abbatis de Hybernia”, in Carl Horstmann, editor, The Early South English Legendary or Lives of Saints[2], London: N. Trübner & Co., published 1887, page 224:
      To a stede ȝe schulle hunne wende : þurf oure louerdes grace, / Þat is foweles parays : a wel ioyful place : / Þer ȝe schulle þis ester beo : & þis wit-sonedai also.
    • c. 1300, Robert of Gloucester, William Aldis Wright, editor, The Metrical Chronicle of Robert of Gloucester, London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, published 1887, page 556:
      Þre siþe he ber croune aȝer · to midewinter at gloucestre · / To witesonetid at westmunstre · to ester at wincestre ·
    • a. 1402, John Trevisa, transl., “De regione lodœœ”, in Joseph Rawson Lumby, editor, Polychronicon, page 111:
      Mysbyleued men mysdede neuere þat chirche ; and þat is, as me troweþ, for euery ȝere an Ester eue comeþ fire from heuene, and tendeþ and liȝteþ þe lamps þerynne ; but whan þat miracle bygan first, hit is vncertayne and vnknowe.

ReferencesEdit

ēster(n, n., MED14534.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

ester m (definite singular esteren, indefinite plural estere, definite plural esterne)

  1. Estonian

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin or Vulgar Latin estō, from Latin stō. Compare with estre.

VerbEdit

ester

  1. to be
  2. to stay; to remain

Usage notesEdit

According to the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub, "[i]t is not always possible to make a valid distinction between and ester and estre"[1].

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. This verb is highly irregular. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ ester on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub. Retrieved August 29 2016

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

NounEdit

ester m inan

  1. ester (organic compound)

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

ester c

  1. an ester
  2. indefinite plural of est

DeclensionEdit

Declension of ester (an ester)
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ester estern estrar estrarna
Genitive esters esterns estrars estrarnas