EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French aubade, from Old French albade, from Latin albus (white).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /oʊˈbɑːd/
  • (file)

NounEdit

aubade (plural aubades)

  1. A song or poem greeting or evoking the dawn.
    • 1956, Anthony Burgess, Time for a Tiger (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 154:
      Alladad Khan woke to the far crying of kampong cocks in the dark. That noise had been the farmyard aubade in the Punjab in his dream.
  2. A morning love song; a song of lovers parting in the morning.

Coordinate termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French aubade, from Middle French aubade, from Old Occitan aubada.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aubade f (plural aubades)

  1. A song or musical performance to honour someone, performed in the morning.
  2. (uncommon, chiefly historical) An aubade, a morning love song.

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French albade.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aubade f (plural aubades)

  1. aubade (song; poem)
  2. aubade (love song)

Further readingEdit