Translingual

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Etymology

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Clipping of Italian italiano

Symbol

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it

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Italian.

English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms

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  • hit (dialectal)
  • i' (colloquial)
  • itt (obsolete)

Etymology

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From Middle English it, hit ( > dialectal English hit (it)), from Old English hit (it), from Proto-West Germanic *hit, from Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe-, *ḱey- (this, here). Cognate with West Frisian it (it), Saterland Frisian et, 't (it), Dutch het (it), Low German it (it), German es (it). Compare also Gothic 𐌹𐍄𐌰 (ita, it), Latin cis (on this), hic (this). More at he.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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it (subjective and objective it, reflexive and intensive itself, possessive determiner and pronoun its, plural subjective they, plural objective case them)

  1. The third-person singular neuter personal pronoun used to refer to an inanimate object, abstract entity, or non-human living thing.
    Take this book and put it on the shelf.
    Take each day as it comes.
    I found a poor little cat. It seems to be half starving.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      It is not a pen. It is a book.
      Audio (US):(file)
    • 2018 August 6, “Brief Introduction of Nansi”, in Nansi District Office, Tainan City[1], archived from the original on 16 February 2022:
      The Nansi District was formerly known as the "Jiaba Community", and was one of the early territories of the Taivoan, as well as where the Zou resided. Later, due to the invasion of the Siraya tribe, the community members later migrated out to regions such as Gongguan, Paoziliao (Kaohsiung County), and Daciouyuan. During the time of the Japanese occupation, because of its location at the west of the "Nanzihsian River", it was therefore renamed Nansi ("si" meaning "west"). A village and village hall were established here, under the governance of Sinhua District of Tainan Province. After the war in 1945, it was renamed Nansi Township, and was changed to Nansi District after the merging of Tainan City and County on December 25th, 2010.
  2. A third-person singular personal pronoun used to refer to a baby or child, especially of unknown gender.
    She took the baby and held it in her arms.
    • 1847, Charlotte Brontë, chapter IV, in Jane Eyre:
      A child cannot quarrel with its elders, as I had done; cannot give its furious feelings uncontrolled play, as I had given mine, without experiencing afterwards the pang of remorse and the chill of reaction.
    • 1859, Wilkie Collins, The Woman in White[2]:
      I could only encourage Mrs. Clements to speak next of Anne's early days [] "There was nobody else, sir, to take the little helpless creature in hand," replied Mrs. Clements. "The wicked mother seemed to hate it—as if the poor baby was in fault!—from the day it was born. My heart was heavy for the child, and I made the offer to bring it up as tenderly as if it was my own."
      "Did Anne remain entirely under your care from that time?"
      "Not quite entirely, sir. Mrs. Catherick had her whims and fancies about it at times, and used now and then to lay claim to the child, as if she wanted to spite me for bringing it up.
    • 2005, Marcus Zusak, The Book Thief, part 10:
      The sky was dripping. Like a tap that a child has tried its hardest to turn off but hasn't quite managed.
  3. (obsolete) An affectionate third-person singular personal pronoun.
    • 1890, George Manville Fenn, Black Blood:
      " [] It's my belief that you don't know your own mind."
      "I don't, dear," said Hulda, nestling to him.
      "Why, what a puss it is!" cried Sir Philip, kissing her tenderly.
    • 1897, Olive Pratt Rayner (Grant Allen), The Type-Writer Girl
      She caught my eye, and laughed. “What a funny girl it is!” she cried. “You are so comical! But it isn't the least use your trying to frighten me. I can see the twinkle in your big black eyes; and I like you in spite of your trying to be horrid. Do you know, I liked you from the first moment I saw you.”
    • 1905, The Harvard Monthly, volumes 39-40, page 183:
      WILLIAM: You don't like me better?
      CLARA: Indeed I do.
      WILLIAM (laughing): Well, what a dear girl it is.
      CLARA (flinging her arms around his neck with suddenly disclosed passion): Oh, I do love you!
  4. (sometimes pejorative or offensive) A third-person singular personal pronoun used to refer to an animate referent who is transgender or is neither female nor male.
    • 1977-1980, Lou Sullivan, personal diary, quoted in 2019, Ellis Martin, Zach Ozma (editors), We Both Laughed In Pleasure
      Next morning bought her [a drag queen] breakfast & she asked for a couple dollars to get a drink. Gave her $3, walked her to a bar. [] Some teenage boys watched us walking & began shouting. When I left her at the bar door & kissed her goodbye, they began shouting "Ugh! You kissed it!!"
    • 1993, Bruce Coville, Aliens Ate My Homework, pages 72–73:
      "Oh, don't be silly. I am neither male nor female. I'm a farfel." [] "It. Refer to me as an it."
      "That seems pretty rude," I said nervously.
      "Not as rude as calling me a he or a she," it said.
    • 2024 January 16, Matteo Garofalo, “Singular Purpose: Calculating the Degree of Ethno-Religious Over-representation in the USNo-Fly List”, in International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy:
      The individual known as Maia Arson Crimew was born as Tillie Kottmann on 7 August 1999 in Lucerne, Switzerland. Kottmann/Crimew has expressed on its website a desire to be referred to by ‘it’ pronouns (Crimew 2021), so this article will interchangeably refer to it by its preferred terms as either ‘Maia Arson Crimew’ or ‘it’.
      Crimew is a well-known figure among hacking and cybersecurity circles. It has either taken credit for or been attributed to hacks from several major multinational corporations, including []
  5. Used to refer to someone being identified, often on the phone, but not limited to this situation.
    It's me. John.
    Is it her?
    It is I, your king.
  6. The impersonal pronoun, used without referent as the subject of an impersonal verb or statement (known as the dummy pronoun, dummy it or weather it).
    It is nearly 10 o’clock.
    It’s 10:45.
    It’s very cold today.
    It’s lonely without you.
  7. The impersonal pronoun, used without referent, or with unstated but contextually implied referent, in various short idioms or expressions.
    rough it
    live it up
    stick it out
    1. Referring to a desirable quality or ability, or quality of being successful, fashionable or in vogue.
      After all these years, she still has it.
      • 2021, Seth Wickersham, It's Better to Be Feared: The New England Patriots Dynasty and the Pursuit of Greatness, Liveright Publishing, →ISBN:
        Later that night, a friend told Brady, “Still got it.” “Never lost it,” he replied. THAT WAS MOSTLY TRUE. But the 2013 season ended with the Patriots coaches wondering whether Brady's skills were in a subtle but irrevocable decline []
    2. Referring to sexual intercourse or other sexual activity.
      I caught them doing it.
      Are you getting it regularly?
      • 1968, Dear Doctor Hip Pocrates; advice your family doctor never gave you, page 5:
        Is man really the only animal who does "it" face to face?
      • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, London: Heinemann, →OCLC, page 14:
        The great advantage of English public school life lies of course in the quality of tutelage it provides. Adrian had received a decent and broad English education in the area of his loins... He had quickly happened upon the truth which many lonely contemporaries would never discover, the truth that everybody, simply everybody, was panting for it and could, with patience, be shown that they were panting for it. So Adrian grabbed what was to hand and had the time of his life genitally—focusing exclusively on his own gender of course, for this was 1973 and girls had not yet been invented.
  8. (uncountable) Sex appeal, especially that which goes beyond physical appearance.
    • 1904, Rudyard Kipling, Mrs Bathurst[3]:
      'Tisn't beauty, so to speak, nor good talk necessarily. It's just It. Some women'll stay in a man's memory if they once walked down a street
    • 1927, Dorothy Parker, “Madame Glyn Lectures on 'It,' with Illustrations”, in The New Yorker, published 1927 November 26; republished in Brendan Gill, editor, The Portable Dorothy Parker, New York: Penguin, 1976, pages 464-468:
      And she had It. It, hell; she had Those.
  9. The impersonal pronoun, used as a placeholder for a delayed subject, or less commonly, object; known as the dummy pronoun (according to some definitions), anticipatory it or, more formally in linguistics, a syntactic expletive. The delayed subject is commonly a to-infinitive, a gerund, or a noun clause introduced by a subordinating conjunction.
    It is easy to see how she would think that.
    (with the infinitive clause headed by to see)
    • 1852 March – 1853 September, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1853, →OCLC:
      "I know now!" said I. "I have seen this in your face a long while."
      "No; have you really, my dear?" said he. "What a Dame Durden it is to read a face!"
    I find it odd that you would say that.
    (with the noun clause introduced by that)
    It is hard seeing you so sick.
    (with the gerund seeing)
    He saw to it that everyone would vote for him.
    (with the noun clause introduced by that)
    It is not clear if the report was true.
    (with the noun clause introduced by if)
  10. All or the end; something after which there is no more.
    Are there more students in this class, or is this it?
    That's it—I'm not going to any more candy stores with you.
  11. (obsolete) Followed by an omitted and understood relative pronoun: That which; what.
    • 1643, Thomas Browne, Religio Medici, II.2:
      In briefe, I am content, and what should providence add more? Surely this is it [= it which] wee call Happinesse, and this doe I enjoy [...].

Usage notes

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Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also

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Determiner

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it

  1. (obsolete) Its.

Noun

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it (plural its)

  1. One who is neither a he nor a she; a creature; a dehumanized being.
    • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, chapter 1, in Bulldog Drummond:
      His master glanced up quickly, and removed the letter from his hands. "I'm surprised at you, James," he remarked severely. "A secretary should control itself. Don't forget that the perfect secretary is an it: an automatic machine—a thing incapable of feeling.…"
    • 1995, Neil Weiner, Sharon E. Robinson Kurpius, Shattered innocence, page 8:
      Too often, children become an "it" in their homes and their humanness is devalued.
  2. The person who chases and tries to catch the other players in the playground game of tag.
    In the next game, Adam and Tom will be it
    • 2000, Katherine T. Thomas, Amelia M. Lee, Jerry R. Thomas, Physical education for children, page 464:
      When there are only two children left who haven't been tagged, I will stop the game, and we will start over with those children starting as the Its.
  3. (British) A game of tag.
    Let's play it at breaktime.
  4. (informal) A desirable characteristic, as being fashionable.
    Man, he's really got it.
    She's the it girl, at least for this Fall.
  5. (informal) Sexual intercourse.
    OMG, they were doing it in the storage room.
  6. (informal) Sex appeal.
    She really has it going on.
  7. Alternative letter-case form of It (force in the vitalist approach of Georg Groddeck)
    • 1988, Frederic D. Homer, The Interpretation of Illness, Purdue University Press, →ISBN, page 27:
      For Groddeck, the it is given, unknowable, and he does not try to conceptualize drives or forces. Early life and sexuality permeate []
  8. Alternative letter-case form of It (the id)
    • 2015, Charis Charalampous, Rethinking the Mind-Body Relationship in Early Modern Literature, Philosophy, and Medicine: The Renaissance of the Body, Routledge, →ISBN, page 36:
      [] thus reversing the roles of the I and the it, the former now occupying the place of the latter and vice versa. An awareness of our bisubjective nature (it and me) requires thus an I as a third term that slides between  []

Translations

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Adjective

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it (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) Most fashionable, popular, or in vogue.
    • 2007 September, Vibe, volume 15, number 9, page 202:
      Going away for the weekend and feel the need to profile en route? This is the "it" bag.
    • 2010, David Germain, Hilarious ‘Kick-Ass’ delivers bloody fun, Associated Press:
      With Hit Girl, Moretz is this year's It Girl, alternately sweet, savage and scary.
    • 2021 October 4, Robert P, “Are Golden Goose Sneakers Worth It? My Honest Review Of Golden Goose Sneakers”, in Gold Talk Club[4]:
      These Italian made sneakers quickly became an it shoe and the trend is not going anywhere any time soon!

References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 Pulleyblank, Edwin G. (1995) Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar

Anagrams

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Azerbaijani

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Other scripts
Cyrillic ит
Abjad ایت

Etymology

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From Proto-Turkic *it, *ït (canine).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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it (definite accusative iti, plural itlər)

  1. dog

Declension

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    Declension of it
singular plural
nominative it
itlər
definite accusative iti
itləri
dative itə
itlərə
locative itdə
itlərdə
ablative itdən
itlərdən
definite genitive itin
itlərin
    Possessive forms of it
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) itim itlərim
sənin (your) itin itlərin
onun (his/her/its) iti itləri
bizim (our) itimiz itlərimiz
sizin (your) itiniz itləriniz
onların (their) iti or itləri itləri
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) itimi itlərimi
sənin (your) itini itlərini
onun (his/her/its) itini itlərini
bizim (our) itimizi itlərimizi
sizin (your) itinizi itlərinizi
onların (their) itini or itlərini itlərini
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) itimə itlərimə
sənin (your) itinə itlərinə
onun (his/her/its) itinə itlərinə
bizim (our) itimizə itlərimizə
sizin (your) itinizə itlərinizə
onların (their) itinə or itlərinə itlərinə
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) itimdə itlərimdə
sənin (your) itində itlərində
onun (his/her/its) itində itlərində
bizim (our) itimizdə itlərimizdə
sizin (your) itinizdə itlərinizdə
onların (their) itində or itlərində itlərində
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) itimdən itlərimdən
sənin (your) itindən itlərindən
onun (his/her/its) itindən itlərindən
bizim (our) itimizdən itlərimizdən
sizin (your) itinizdən itlərinizdən
onların (their) itindən or itlərindən itlərindən
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) itimin itlərimin
sənin (your) itinin itlərinin
onun (his/her/its) itinin itlərinin
bizim (our) itimizin itlərimizin
sizin (your) itinizin itlərinizin
onların (their) itinin or itlərinin itlərinin

Derived terms

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  • itbaz (caninophile)

See also

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Further reading

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  • it” in Obastan.com.

Charrua

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Noun

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it

  1. fire

References

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  • Rodolfo Maruca Sosa, La nación charrúa (1957)

Chuukese

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Noun

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it

  1. name

Crimean Tatar

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Etymology

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From Proto-Turkic *it, *ït.

Noun

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it

  1. dog

Synonyms

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References

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  • Mirjejev, V. A., Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[5], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Hokkien

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For pronunciation and definitions of it – see (“one; each; every; etc.”).
(This term is the pe̍h-ōe-jī form of ).

Irish

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Contraction

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it (triggers lenition)

  1. (Munster) Contraction of i do (in your).
    Buail it phóca é.
    Put it in your pocket.
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Jamaican Creole

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /it/
  • Hyphenation: it

Etymology 1

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Derived from English it. Compare English hit, Gullah i, Antigua and Barbuda Creole English it, Guyanese Creole English ii, Hawaiian Creole it, Nigerian Pidgin it, Vincentian Creole English e, Yola yt, Old English ġit, Proto-Germanic *hit.

Pronoun

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it

  1. Third-person singular neuter pronoun: it
  2. Third-person singular neuter accusative pronoun: it
Usage notes
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Neutral form, contrasting with i in unstressed positions and hit in stressed position.[1]

Etymology 2

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Derived from English hit.

Verb

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it

  1. (rare) to hit
    The template Template:rfex does not use the parameter(s):
2=Majstro.com shows it as a word for "hit" but I'm not sure

Please see Module:checkparams for help with this warning.

(Can we add an example for this sense?)

  1. Synonym: lik

References

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  1. ^ F. G. Cassidy, R. B. Le Page (2002) Dictionary of Jamaican English, 2nd edition, The University of the West Indies Press, →ISBN, page 233

Further reading

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  • it at majstro.com

Karaim

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Etymology

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From Proto-Turkic *ɨt.

Noun

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it

  1. dog, hound

References

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  • N. A. Baskakov, S.M. Šapšala, editor (1973), “it”, in Karaimsko-Russko-Polʹskij Slovarʹ [Karaim-Russian-Polish Dictionary], Moscow: Moskva, →ISBN

Latin

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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it

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of

Latvian

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Particle

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it

  1. used to assign accentuation to expression
    it sevišķiespecially
    it nekasnothing at all
    it nekurnowhere at all
    it nemaznot at all
    itas if

Middle Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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it

  1. Alternative form of het

Middle English

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Pronoun

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it

  1. Alternative form of hit (it)

Determiner

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it

  1. Alternative form of hit (it)

Middle Low German

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Etymology

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From Old Saxon it, from Proto-Germanic *hit.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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it

  1. (third person singular neuter nominative) it
  2. (third person singular neuter accusative) it

Declension

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Descendants

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  • Low German: et, it
  • Plautdietsch: et

Northern Sami

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Pronunciation

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  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈih(t)/

Verb

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it

  1. second-person singular present of ii

Old Irish

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Alternative forms

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  • (second-person singular form) at

Pronunciation

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  • (second-person singular form) IPA(key): /it/
  • (third-person plural form) IPA(key): /id/

Verb

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it

  1. inflection of is:
    1. second-person singular present indicative
    2. third-person plural present indicative

Old Norse

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *jit, North-West Germanic form of *jut. Cognate with Old English ġit, Gothic 𐌾𐌿𐍄 (jut).

Pronoun

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it

  1. (personal) second-person dual pronoun; you two

Declension

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Descendants

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The Western descendants derive from þit, due to influence of the 2nd plural ending . Compare þér (you (plural)).

References

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  1. ^ Howe, Stephen (1996) “14. Old/Middle Swedish”, in The Personal Pronouns in the Germanic Languages: A Study of Personal Pronoun Morphology and Change in the Germanic Languages from the First Records to the Present Day, Walter de Gruyter

Old Saxon

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *it.

Pronoun

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it n

  1. it

Declension

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Descendants

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  • Middle Low German: it
    • Low German: et, it
    • Plautdietsch: et

Piedmontese

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Pronoun

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it

  1. you (singular)

Sathmar Swabian

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Adverb

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it

  1. not

References

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  • Claus Stephani, Volksgut der Sathmarschwaben (1985)

Turkish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Ottoman Turkish ایت (it), from Proto-Turkic *ït. Compare Yakut ыт (ıt, dog).

Noun

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it (definite accusative iti, plural itler)

  1. (often derogatory) dog
  2. (derogatory) scoundrel, detestable person, cur
Usage notes
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Not historically derogatory, and still used as the primary term for "dog" in the countryside. Usually, if a dog is a stray or feral, it can be referred to as "it" as well. The more usual word is köpek, which is also pejorative and derogatory when used for a person.

Declension
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Inflection
Nominative it
Definite accusative iti
Singular Plural
Nominative it itler
Definite accusative iti itleri
Dative ite itlere
Locative itte itlerde
Ablative itten itlerden
Genitive itin itlerin
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular itim itlerim
2nd singular itin itlerin
3rd singular iti itleri
1st plural itimiz itlerimiz
2nd plural itiniz itleriniz
3rd plural itleri itleri
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular itimi itlerimi
2nd singular itini itlerini
3rd singular itini itlerini
1st plural itimizi itlerimizi
2nd plural itinizi itlerinizi
3rd plural itlerini itlerini
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular itime itlerime
2nd singular itine itlerine
3rd singular itine itlerine
1st plural itimize itlerimize
2nd plural itinize itlerinize
3rd plural itlerine itlerine
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular itimde itlerimde
2nd singular itinde itlerinde
3rd singular itinde itlerinde
1st plural itimizde itlerimizde
2nd plural itinizde itlerinizde
3rd plural itlerinde itlerinde
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular itimden itlerimden
2nd singular itinden itlerinden
3rd singular itinden itlerinden
1st plural itimizden itlerimizden
2nd plural itinizden itlerinizden
3rd plural itlerinden itlerinden
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular itimin itlerimin
2nd singular itinin itlerinin
3rd singular itinin itlerinin
1st plural itimizin itlerimizin
2nd plural itinizin itlerinizin
3rd plural itlerinin itlerinin
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular itim itlerim
2nd singular itsin itlersin
3rd singular it
ittir
itler
itlerdir
1st plural itiz itleriz
2nd plural itsiniz itlersiniz
3rd plural itler itlerdir

Etymology 2

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Verb

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it

  1. second-person singular imperative of itmek

Turkmen

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Etymology

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From Old Turkic ıt (dog), from Proto-Turkic *īt, *ıyt, *ɨt, *it.

Noun

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it (definite accusative idi, plural itler)

  1. dog

Declension

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Uzbek

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Etymology

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From Proto-Turkic *ɨt, *it.

Noun

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it (plural itlar)

  1. dog

Declension

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Volapük

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Determiner

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it

  1. (with a personal pronoun) self; myself; yourself; himself; herself; itself; ourselves; themselves; emphasises the identity or singularity of the modified noun phrase
    • 1932, Arie de Jong, Leerboek der Wereldtaal, page 15:
      Ob it egivob ciles et magodis ot.
      I have given those children the same pictures myself.

Welsh

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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it

  1. (literary) second-person singular of i

West Frisian

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Etymology 1

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From Old Frisian hit, from Proto-Germanic *hit.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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it

  1. it (third-person singular neuter pronoun)
Inflection
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Further reading
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  • it (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2

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From Old Frisian thet, from Proto-Germanic *þat.

Pronunciation

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Determiner

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it

  1. neuter singular of de

Yola

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle English hit, from Old English hit.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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it

  1. it
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 23:
      Awye wough it.
      Away with it.
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 53:
      Leth it be.
      Let it be.
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 56:
      Dinna mell wi' it.
      Don't meddle with it.

Derived terms

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References

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  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 23

Zhuang

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Zhuang cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : it

Etymology

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From Chinese (MC 'jit, “one”). Cognate with Thai เอ็ด (èt), Lao ເອັດ (ʼet), Shan ဢဵတ်း (ʼáet), Ahom 𑜒𑜢𑜄𑜫 (ʼit), Bouyei idt.

Pronunciation

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Numeral

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it (1957–1982 spelling it)

  1. one
    daih'it
    first
    song bak it
    two hundred and ten
    it cien
    one thousand

Usage notes

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Used with ngeih rather than song.

Synonyms

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