See also: Oma, OMA, omã, Omã, omā, öma, and -oma

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Oma.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oma ‎(plural omas)

  1. (among people of German ancestry) grandmother, grandma.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oma f ‎(plural oma's, diminutive omaatje n)

  1. (colloquial) grandma, granny, nan

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


EstonianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

oma ‎(not comparable)

  1. own

FinnishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

oma ‎(comparative omempi, superlative omin)

  1. own
  2. (military) friendly

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of oma (Kotus type 10/koira, no gradation)
nominative oma omat
genitive oman omien
partitive omaa omia
illative omaan omiin
singular plural
nominative oma omat
accusative nom. oma omat
gen. oman
genitive oman omien
omainrare
partitive omaa omia
inessive omassa omissa
elative omasta omista
illative omaan omiin
adessive omalla omilla
ablative omalta omilta
allative omalle omille
essive omana omina
translative omaksi omiksi
instructive omin
abessive omatta omitta
comitative omine

Derived termsEdit

CompoundsEdit

NounEdit

oma

  1. (military, chiefly in the plural) friendly (someone/s on the same side)
    Älä ammu, ne ovat omia.
    Don't shoot, they are friendlies.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of oma (Kotus type 10/koira, no gradation)
nominative oma omat
genitive oman omien
partitive omaa omia
illative omaan omiin
singular plural
nominative oma omat
accusative nom. oma omat
gen. oman
genitive oman omien
omainrare
partitive omaa omia
inessive omassa omissa
elative omasta omista
illative omaan omiin
adessive omalla omilla
ablative omalta omilta
allative omalle omille
essive omana omina
translative omaksi omiksi
instructive omin
abessive omatta omitta
comitative omineen

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

NounEdit

oma

  1. lobster

LadinEdit

NounEdit

oma f ‎(plural omans)

  1. mother

LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

A borrowing from Old East Slavic умъ ‎(umŭ, mind, intellect) (cf. Russian ум ‎(um, mind, intellect, wit)), cognate with Lithuanian aumuõ ‎(understanding, notion, intellect), genitive aumeñs. This word was borrowed into Latvian before the 13th century, while Old East Slavic у was still close to [o] in pronunciation. It conserved its original meaning (“mind,” “understanding”) well into the 19th century; the modern sense was an innovation introduced by A. Kronvalds.[1]

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

oma f (4th declension)

  1. mood (mental or emotional state)
    būt labā omā — to be in a good mood
    būt priecīgā omā — to be in a cheerful mood
    viņš šodien ir sliktā omā — he is in a bad mood today

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “oma”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN 9984-700-12-7

VolapükEdit

PronounEdit

oma

  1. (genitive singular of om) "his"

SynonymsEdit

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