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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

fi

  1. (music) The solfeggio syllable used to indicate the sharp of the fourth note of a major scale.

Etymology 2Edit

Abbreviation

NounEdit

fi (uncountable)

  1. (in combination) Abbreviation of fidelity. (e.g. in hi-fi or wi-fi)
  2. (in combination) Abbreviation of fiction. (e.g. in sci-fi)

Etymology 3Edit

The word if spelled backwards, introduced in the ALGOL 68 Report (1968) as a terminator for an if clause.

ConjunctionEdit

fi

  1. (computer science) Reserved word, in some programming languagess, signaling the end of an "if" program instruction.
    In ALGOL 68 the if clause must be terminated by fi (which is if spelt backwards).
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BourguignonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin filius.

NounEdit

fi m (plural fis)

  1. son

Derived termsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin fīnis.

NounEdit

fi f (plural fins)

  1. finish; the end
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin fīnītus, either via Old French fin or an Old Occitan variant.

AdjectiveEdit

fi (feminine fina, masculine plural fins, feminine plural fines)

  1. fine, thin
  2. soft, smooth
  3. sharp, keen

Etymology 3Edit

Ancient Greek, via Latin phi

NounEdit

fi f (plural fis)

  1. Phi; the Greek letter Φ (lowercase φ).

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French fi.

InterjectionEdit

fi

  1. For shame!
    "Jes, mi frapis mian frateton kaj mi ne bedaŭras ĝin!" "Ho, fi!"
    "Yes, I hit my little brother and I'm not sorry about it!" "Oh, for shame!"
    Fi al vi!Shame on you!

FasEdit

NounEdit

fi

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • ASJP, citing W. Baron, Kwomtari Survey (1983, SIL)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Imitative.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fi/
  • (file)
  • Homophones: fie, fient, fies

InterjectionEdit

fi

  1. (archaic) faugh, fie

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fīlius.

NounEdit

fi m (plural fis)

  1. son

Related termsEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French fille (girl, daughter).

NounEdit

fi

  1. girl
  2. daughter

Jamaican CreoleEdit

PrepositionEdit

fi

  1. To.
    • 1997, Mr. Vegas, Heads High (song):
      Mi wan fi hear yuh scream.
      "I want to hear you scream."
    • 2002, Sean Paul, Get Busy (song):
      Me want fi see you get live ‘pon the riddim
    • 2006, Otelemate G. Harry, 'Jamaican Creole', in The Journal of the International Phonetic Association, volume 33, no. 1:
      im rap op ina wan jakit fi kiip aut di kuol.
      "He wrapped up in a warm jacket to keep out the cold."

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

fi

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ふぃ
  2. Rōmaji transcription of フィ

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

  1. pah!, pooh!, foh!, bah!, an expression of disgust
    Fi, fi fetet!
    Pah, it stinks!

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

  1. second-person singular present passive imperative of faciō

ReferencesEdit

  • fi in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fi in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fi m (plural fi)

  1. phi (name of the Greek letter Φ)

RomanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • фи (Moldavian Cyrillic spelling)

EtymologyEdit

Suppletive verb formed from Latin sum, fuī, with the infinitive and subjunctive forms replaced by fierī, present active infinitive of fiō. Latin sum derives from Proto-Italic *ezom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti (I am, I exist), while fiō derives from Proto-Italic *fuiō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to grow, become, come into being, appear).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

a fi (third-person singular present este or e, past participle fost4th conj.

  1. to be

Usage notesEdit

  • One can also use e as an informal variant of the third-person singular present tense, este.
  • The second entries in the simple perfect row represent the informal variants.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin focus (hearth, fireplace).

NounEdit

fi m

  1. (Surmiran) fire

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -i

NounEdit

fi f (plural fíes)

  1. phi; the Greek letter Φ, φ

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *mī.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

fi

  1. me