EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
An instar of the mayfly Cloeon dipterum

From Latin instar (form, likeness), which is of obscure origin.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɪnstɑː/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɪnstɑɹ/
  • Hyphenation: in‧star
  • (file)

NounEdit

instar (plural instars)

  1. Any one of the several stages of postembryonic development which an arthropod undergoes, between molts, before it reaches sexual maturity.
  2. An arthropod at a specified one of these stages of development.
    • 2005, Nematodes as biocontrol agents, Parwinder S. Grewal, Ralf-Udo Ehlers, David I. Shapiro-Ilan, editor,(Please provide the book title or journal name), page 133:
      In A. orientalis, first and second instars were more susceptible than third instars to H. bacteriophora TF strain, []
  3. (by extension) A stage in development.
    • 1955, Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita (Crest Giant; D338), Greenwich, Conn.: Fawcett Publications, published December 1959, OCLC 768447:
      We avoided Tourist Homes, country cousins of Funeral ones, old-fashioned, genteel and showerless, with elaborate dressing tables in depressingly white-and-pink little bedrooms, and photographs of the landlady’s children in all their instars.
    • 2014 January 8, Caleb Crain, “The Democratic Personality”, in The New Yorker[2]:
      California spirituality is a late instar of America’s utopian impulse, and corporate meritocracy derives from the Whig dream of the self-made man that entranced young Abraham Lincoln.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From in- +‎ star.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

instar (third-person singular simple present instars, present participle instarring, simple past and past participle instarred)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To stud or adorn with stars or other brilliants; to star.
    • 1882, Frederick Randolph Abbe, The Temple Rebuilt: A Poem, page 125:
      Yet mark with shining steps the humbler way;
      And, as angelic feet instar the sky,
      Drop the bright sparks along the wilderness.
    • 1893, The Atlantic Monthly, volume 72, page 507:
      Espey could distinguish through the clear darkness the fringed branches of a pine-tree clinging to the heights above and waving against the instarred sky, and below a vague moving whiteness []
    • 1896, Mary Noailles Murfree (pseudonym Charles Egbert Craddock), In the Tennessee mountains, 14 edition, page 209:
      He was dreaming, surely; or were those deep, instarred eyes really fixed upon him with that wistful gaze which he had seen only twice before?
  2. (transitive) To make a star of; set as a star.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin īnstar (equivalent).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃s.taʁ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: in‧star

NounEdit

instar

  1. Only used in à l'instar de (just like)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of obscure origin.[1][2] Perhaps from a metaphor meaning 'to stand close to', thereby semantically related to ἔχθαρ.[3]

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

īnstar n sg (indeclinable, no genitive)

  1. image, likeness, resemblance
  2. counterpart
  3. worth, value
  4. an equal form (of)
  5. of equal weight/size/form (to)
    • 1539 CE, Olaus Magnus, Carta Marina, marginal note.
      Quia, optime lector, Scandiana insula apud Plinium alter orbis terrarum, et a Iordane Gotho ac Paulo Diacono vagina sive officina gentium appellatur, plurimique populi (ut omnis scriptorum turba testatur) ex ea instar apum vel inundantium aquarum exiere, utile putavi nomina aliquarum gentium inde egressarum subiecta pagina indicare.
      Since, dear reader, the isle of Scandinavia is called another world in Pliny's works, and since it is called by Jordanes the Goth and Paul the Deacon a womb or manufacturing-room of ethnic groups, and since numerous peoples (as any group of scholars can attest) descended from there like a swarm of bees or floodwaters, I thought it useful to indicate, on the page below, the names of various ethnic groups that originated there.

DeclensionEdit

Not declined; used only in the nominative and accusative singular, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative īnstar
Genitive
Dative
Accusative īnstar
Ablative
Vocative

DescendantsEdit

  • English: instar
  • French: instar

ReferencesEdit

  • instar”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • instar”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • instar in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  1. ^ Eduard Wölfflin, Archiv für Lateinische Lexikographie und Grammatik mit Einschluß des älteren Mittellateins, Band 2, pp. 581-597, [1]
  2. ^ Menge, Burkard, et al., Lehrbuch der lateinischen Syntax und Semantik, p. 13.
  3. ^ Puhvel, ‘Greek Ἔχϑαρ and Latin Instar’.

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin īnstāre.

PronunciationEdit

 

VerbEdit

instar (first-person singular present insto, first-person singular preterite instei, past participle instado) (intransitive)

  1. to urge [+ com (someone)]
  2. to insist [+ por (object) = on], to ask insistently for
  3. to question insistently, to interrogate [+ a (someone)]
  4. to be imminent, to lurk
  5. to be urgent or necessary

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin īnstō (urge, insist) whence English instant.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /insˈtaɾ/ [ĩnsˈt̪aɾ]
  • Rhymes: -aɾ
  • Hyphenation: ins‧tar

VerbEdit

instar (first-person singular present insto, first-person singular preterite insté, past participle instado)

  1. (intransitive) to urge (press someone to do something soon)
    Synonyms: urgir, apretar
  2. (transitive) to insist (repeat a plea)
    Synonym: insistir

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit