See also: Stud and stuð

English

edit

Etymology 1

edit

From Middle English stood, stod, from Old English stōd, from Proto-West Germanic *stōd, from Proto-Germanic *stōdą. Cognate with Middle Low German stōt, German Stute, Dutch stoet and Old Norse stóð.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

stud (plural studs)

  1. A male animal, especially a stud horse (stallion), kept for breeding.
    Synonym: sire
  2. A female animal, especially a studmare (broodmare), kept for breeding.
  3. (by extension, collective) A group of such animals, also of locomotives.
    • 1849–1861, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 20, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volumes (please specify |volume=I to V), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, →OCLC:
      He had the finest stud in England, and his delight was to win plates from Tories.
    • 1949 November and December, O. S. Nock, “Twenty-Four Hours at York—2”, in Railway Magazine, page 358:
      In freight working a considerable stud of ex-N.E.R. 3-cylinder 4-6-0s of Class "B16" is used, some of which include the Thompson modifications to the front end.
    • 1960 February, R. C. Riley, “The London-Birmingham services - Past, Present and Future”, in Trains Illustrated, page 98:
      At that time, therefore, L.M.S. motive power for the increased loads of the Birmingham trains was less than adequate, whereas the G.W.R. route had an ample stud of Churchward and Collett 4-6-0s, and timekeeping was good.
  4. An animal (usually livestock) that has been registered and is retained for breeding.
  5. A place, such as a ranch, where such animals are kept.
    • 1673, Sir William Temple, 1st Baronet, An Essay upon the Advancement of Trade in Ireland:
      In the studs of persons of quality in Ireland, where care is taken, [] we see horses bred of excellent shape, vigour, and size.
  6. (colloquial) A sexually attractive male.
    Synonyms: he-man, hunk, stallion
    • 1969, Waldo Salt, Midnight Cowboy, spoken by Joe Buck (Jon Voight):
      Well, I'll tell you the truth now. I ain't a for-real cowboy, but I am one hell of a stud!
    • 1986, Jim Cash, Jack Epps Jr., Top Gun (motion picture), spoken by Charlie (Kelly McGillis):
      Maverick, you big stud… Take me to bed or lose me forever.
    • 1998, Tim Herlihy, The Wedding Singer, spoken by Robbie Hart (Adam Sandler):
      Wow, Julia! Sounds like to me like you got your pick of any man in this room to dance with so I want you to take your time and find amongst all these young studs here tonight the coolest, most un-losery guy in the bunch
    • 1999 December 16, Mark Wolf, “The V-chip has arrived with little fanfare”, in The Coshocton Tribune[1]:
      Those soap-opera studs and studettes sliding between satin sheets in the afternoon?
  7. (LGBT, slang) A sexually dominant lesbian, chiefly African-American.
    • 1983 August 13, Lisa Smith, “Personal advertisement”, in Gay Community News, volume 11, number 5, page 22:
      Down and lonely stud, 23 years old, wants comfort from sweet-hearted fem.
Derived terms
edit
Translations
edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2

edit

From Old English studu.

Noun

edit

stud (plural studs)

  1. A small object that protrudes from something; an ornamental knob.
    a collar with studs
  2. (jewelry) A style of earring where the decorative element is mounted on a straight post.
    She's wearing studs in her ears.
  3. (construction) A vertical post, especially one of the small uprights in the framing for lath and plaster partitions, and furring, and upon which the laths are nailed.
  4. (obsolete) A stem; a trunk.
  5. (poker) A type of poker in which the player cannot discard, and some of the cards are exposed.
    Synonym: stud poker
  6. (engineering) A short rod or pin, fixed in and projecting from something, and sometimes forming a journal.
  7. (engineering) A stud bolt.
  8. An iron brace across the shorter diameter of the link of a chain cable.
Derived terms
edit
Translations
edit

Verb

edit

stud (third-person singular simple present studs, present participle studding, simple past and past participle studded)

  1. To set with studs; to furnish with studs.
  2. To decorate as a stud does.
    • 1910, E. B. Stebbing, “The Loranthus Parasite of the Moru and Ban Oaks”, in Journal and Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, page 192:
      The fruit [of Loranthus vestitus] is yellowish and fleshy, and is almost sessile on the stem, which it thickly studs.
  3. To be scattered over the surface of (something) at intervals.
    • 2012, Antony Cooke, Dark Nebulae, Dark Lanes, and Dust Belts, page 82:
      [S]eemingly countless young hot stars stud the entire huge central region[.]
  4. To set (something) over a surface at intervals.
    • 2010, Rose Levy Beranbaum, Rose's Heavenly Cakes:
      Stud the cake all over with chocolate chips, pointed ends in.
    • 2016, Mary Price, Vincent Price, Mary and Vincent Price's Come Into the Kitchen Cook Book, page 70:
      Stud the onion with cloves and add to the pan.

Etymology 3

edit

Noun

edit

stud (plural studs)

  1. Clipping of student.

References

edit
  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Further reading

edit

Anagrams

edit

Czech

edit
 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology

edit

Inherited from Old Czech stud, from Proto-Slavic *studъ (cold, shame) .

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): [ˈstut]
  • Hyphenation: stud
  • Rhymes: -ut

Noun

edit

stud m inan

  1. shame (uncomfortable or painful feeling)

Declension

edit
edit

Further reading

edit
  • stud”, in Příruční slovník jazyka českého (in Czech), 1935-1957
  • stud”, in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého (in Czech), 1960–1971, 1989
  • stud”, in Internetová jazyková příručka (in Czech)

Danish

edit

Etymology

edit

From Old Norse stútr, from or related to Proto-Germanic *stautōną (to push).

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

stud c (singular definite studen, plural indefinite stude)

  1. bullock, steer
  2. boor, oaf

Declension

edit

References

edit

Dutch

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

stud m (plural studs, diminutive studje n)

  1. colloquial (in the Netherlands) abbreviation of student

References

edit
  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

French

edit

Etymology

edit

From English.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

stud m (plural studs)

  1. stud where stallions and mares are bred to improve the equine race
  2. assembly of horses for sale or racing

References

edit
  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

Middle English

edit

Etymology 1

edit

Noun

edit

stud

  1. Alternative form of stede (place)

Etymology 2

edit

Noun

edit

stud

  1. Alternative form of stod (stud)

Serbo-Croatian

edit

Etymology

edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *studъ.

Noun

edit

stȗd f (Cyrillic spelling сту̑д)

  1. (expressively) cold

Declension

edit