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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek κᾰνών (kanṓn, straight rod, bar)

NounEdit

kanon (plural kanons)

  1. (music) Synonym of monochord (used mainly in reference to ancient Greek music)

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Armenian քանոն (kʿanon).

NounEdit

kanon (plural kanons)

  1. (music) Synonym of qanun (used mainly in reference to Armenian music)

See alsoEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old French canon, from Italian cannone.

NounEdit

kanon c (singular definite kanonen, plural indefinite kanoner)

  1. cannon (weapon)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French canon, from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קָנֶה(qane, reed)).

NounEdit

kanon c (singular definite kanonen, plural indefinite kanoner)

  1. canon (group of literary works)
DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kaːˈnɔn/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ka‧non
  • Rhymes: -ɔn

NounEdit

kanon n (plural kanonnen or kanons, diminutive kanonnetje n)

  1. cannon (weapon)

Derived termsEdit


EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

kanon

  1. accusative singular of kano

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old French canon, from Italian cannone.

NounEdit

kanon m (definite singular kanonen, indefinite plural kanoner, definite plural kanonene)

  1. (weaponry) cannon
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French canon, from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קָנֶה(qane, reed)).

NounEdit

kanon m (definite singular kanonen, indefinite plural kanoner, definite plural kanonene)

  1. (literature) canon (group of literary works)
  2. (bible) canon
  3. (music) canon
  4. (religion) canon (decree or law)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old French canon, from Italian cannone.

NounEdit

kanon m (definite singular kanonen, indefinite plural kanonar, definite plural kanonane)

  1. (weaponry) cannon
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French canon, from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קָנֶה(qane, reed)).

NounEdit

kanon m (definite singular kanonen, indefinite plural kanonar, definite plural kanonane)

  1. (literature) canon (group of literary works)
  2. (bible) canon
  3. (music) canon
  4. (religion) canon (decree or law)

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kanon c

  1. cannon, gun; a weapon (inf. 1)
  2. (music) canon

DeclensionEdit

Declension of kanon 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative kanon kanonen kanoner kanonerna
Genitive kanons kanonens kanoners kanonernas

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kanon

  1. (colloquial) very good

InterjectionEdit

kanon

  1. super, great