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See also: legär

Contents

LatinEdit

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

legar m

  1. plural indefinite of lege

Old PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin ligāre, present active infinitive of ligō.

VerbEdit

legar

  1. to tie, bind

Old SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin ligāre, present active infinitive of ligō.

VerbEdit

legar

  1. to tie, bind (e.g. with rope)
    • circa 1260, Gonzalo de Berceo, Milagros de Nuestra Señora:
      legáronli las manos con un fuerte dogal
  2. to make impotent for procreation through the use of a spell or hex[1]

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Spanish: legar (regional, rare)

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

NounEdit

legar m inan

  1. joist

DeclensionEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin legāre, present active infinitive of legō.

VerbEdit

legar (first-person singular present indicative lego, past participle legado)

  1. to bequeath, leave, will (make a bequest)
  2. to legate

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin legāre, present active infinitive of legō.

VerbEdit

legar (first-person singular present lego, first-person singular preterite legué, past participle legado)

  1. to hand down
ConjugationEdit
  • Rule: g becomes a gu before e.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Spanish legar, inherited from Latin ligāre, present active infinitive of ligō. Compare the doublets ligar and liar.

VerbEdit

legar

  1. (rare) to join, bring together, unite[1]
  2. (rare, regional) to tie or bind (especially in the context of tying sheep for shearing[2])
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit