See also: porrò

AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

porro m (plural porros)

  1. leek

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin porrum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

porro m (plural porros)

  1. (botany) leek
  2. (slang) a cigarette made with cannabis, joint

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

porro

  1. illative singular of poro

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈporːo/, [ˈpo̞rːo̞]
  • Rhymes: -orːo
  • Syllabification: por‧ro

NounEdit

porro

  1. Synonym of valkoporro (Ballota nigra)
  2. any plant of the genus Ballota
  3. (in the plural) the genus Ballota

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of porro (Kotus type 2/palvelu, no gradation)
nominative porro porrot
genitive porron porrojen
porroiden
porroitten
partitive porroa porroja
porroita
illative porroon porroihin
singular plural
nominative porro porrot
accusative nom. porro porrot
gen. porron
genitive porron porrojen
porroiden
porroitten
partitive porroa porroja
porroita
inessive porrossa porroissa
elative porrosta porroista
illative porroon porroihin
adessive porrolla porroilla
ablative porrolta porroilta
allative porrolle porroille
essive porrona porroina
translative porroksi porroiksi
instructive porroin
abessive porrotta porroitta
comitative porroineen
Possessive forms of porro (type palvelu)
possessor singular plural
1st person porroni porromme
2nd person porrosi porronne
3rd person porronsa

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

13th century. From Old Galician and Old Portuguese, from Latin porrum (leek).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

porro m (plural porros)

  1. (botany) leek
    Synonym: allo porro
  2. (slang) joint (marijuana cigarette)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • porro” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • porro” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • porro” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • porro” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin porrum.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɔr.ro/, [ˈpɔr̺r̺o]
  • Rhymes: -ɔrro
  • Hyphenation: pòr‧ro

NounEdit

porro m (plural porri)

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it
  1. leek
  2. wart
    Synonym: verruca

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Alemannic German: Bor

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain; the traditional view (supported by ancient grammarians) connects it with the Ancient Greek πόρρω (pórrhō), similar in form and meaning. However, the old form of this Greek word, πρόσω (prósō), would not easily align with the derivation of the Latin word. Moreover, adverbs are not usually borrowed from other languages. In all probability related to Proto-Indo-European *pro-.

De Vaan clarifies the archaic Praenestinian Latino-Faliscan POROD is not an ablative, and mentions a very tentative derivation, by Nussbaum, of Proto-Indo-European *pro- + an adverbial -s + the suffix observed in Latin intrō, ultrō, contrōversia, effectively *prs-ō > *porsō > porrō.

AdverbEdit

porrō (not comparable)

  1. (of motion) on, forward, onward
    • c. 254 BCE – 184 BCE, Plautus, Captivi 3.5.65:
      Inde ībis porrō in latomiās lapidāriās.
      From there you’ll go on in the stone quarries.
    1. (of giving something received) forward
      • c. 7th – 5th C. BCE, CIL I2 560 d, in Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum, volume I fascicle 2, Ernst Lommatzch & Theodor Mommsen (editors), Berlin, 1918, page 430:
        FERI·POROD
        Give forward
        Note: The phrase is written underneath a drawing of a slave in the kitchen, helping with the preparation of a meal for the Lares, handing another worker a plate of food.
      • c. 150 BCE, Terence, Phormio 5.7.28–30:
        DĒMIPHŌ. Sed trānsī sōdēs ad forum atque illud mihī
        argentum rūrsum iubĕ rescrībī, Phormiō.
        PHORMIŌ. Quodne ego dīscrīpsī porrō illīs quibŭs dēbuī?
        DEMIPHO. But go over to the forum if you will and order that
        silver to be returned to my account, Phormio.
        PHORMIO. That which I’ve transferred forward to my creditors?
  2. (static; Old Latin, Late Latin, poetic) away, yonder
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 6.710–712:
      Horrēscit vīsū subitō causāsque requīrit
      īnscius Aenēās, quae sint ea flūmina porrō,
      quīve virī tantō complērint agmine rīpās?
      Aeneas is scared at the sudden sight and asks,
      ignorant, for the causes: which might those yonder rivers be,
      and which men might fill the banks with such a multitude?
  3. (of motion; Old Latin, Late Latin; rare outside of etymological glosses) outwards, away, outside
    • 2nd–3rd C. CE, Pomponius Porphyrio, Scholia on Horace, Odes 1.12.37 in Scholia antiqva in Q. Horativm Flaccvm (volume I), Alfred Holder (editor), Arno Press, 1984, page 20, lines 5–6:
      Prōdigī enim dīcuntur propriē, quī bona sua ā sē dispergunt, quasi porrō ea ab sē agentēs.
      Prodigals are called those who scatter their wealth, as if “directing it away from themselves”.
  4. (Vulgar Latin; only in the work cited) Synonym of ūsque
    • p. 380 CE, Egeria, Itinerarium Egeriae 36.3:
      Quī locus ad quod lectus fuerit, tantus rugītus et mūgītus totīus populī est cum flētū, ut forsitan porrō ad cīvitātem gemitus populī omnis audītus sit.
      Which place, when it had been read up to it, there’s such a roar and bellow of the people with crying, that the groan of the entire crowd was perhaps heard all the way to the city.
  5. then
    1. (in speaking, listening, argumentation) then, furthermore, besides
      • 163 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Heauton Timorumenos 4.5.23:
        Sed porrō auscultā quod superest fallaciae.
        Listen furthermore the rest of the stratagem.
      • 85 BCE, Cicero, De inventione 1.34.59:
        Huius assūmptiōnis quārtō in locō aliam porrō indūcunt approbātiōnem, hōc modō: []
        Then, in the fourth place, they introduce another proof of this assumption, like this: []
      • c. 186 CE, Martial, Epigrams, preface to book II:
        “Quid nōbīs” inquis “cum epistulā? Parum enim tibi praestāmus, sī legimus epigrammata? Quid hīc porrō dictūrus es quod non possīs versibus dīcere?”
        “What do we” you say “have to do with a letter? are we supporting you too little if we read your epigrams? Besides, what are you going to say here that you couldn’t in verse?”
    2. (temporal) then, afterwards, thereafter, in the future
      • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 40.36:
        Lēgātus ad ea, quae interrogātus erat, respondit neque sē neque quemquam alium dīvīnāre posse, quid in animō Celtibērī habērent aut porrō habitūrī essent.
        To what he had been asked the legate responded that neither he nor anyone else could predict what the Celtiberians intended or were going to intend in the future.
    3. (in enumerations) then, and
      • c. 125 CE – 180 CE, Apuleius, Metamorphoses 11.8:
        Hic incīnctus balteō mīlitem gerēbat, illum succīnctum chlamyde crepidēs et vēnābula vēnātōrem fēcerant, alius soccīs obaurātīs inductus sēricā veste mundōque prētiōsō et attextīs capite crīnibus incessū perfluō fēminam mentiēbātur. Porrō alium ocreīs scutō galeā ferrōque īnsīgnem ē lūdō putārēs gladiātōriō prōcēdere.
        One, strapped with a sword-belt, pretended to be a soldier, sandals and spears made another, girt with a cloak, a hunter, and another one, dressed in gilded slippers was imitating a woman with his silken garment, costly jewellery and long hair attached to the head, with a flowing gait. Then another, distinguished with greaves, helmet and sword, you’d have thought to come straight from the gladiator school.
      • 4th C. CE, Saint Jerome, Vulgate, Numbers 26:20–21:
        Fuēruntque fīliī Jūda per cognātiōnēs suās: Sēla, ā quō familia Sēlaītārum: Phares, ā quō familia Pharesītārum: Zare, ā quō familia Zareītārum. Porrō filii Phares: Hesrōn, ā quō familia Hesrōnītārum: et Hamūl, ā quō familia Hamūlītārum.
        And the sons of Judah after their families were: of Shelah, the family of the Shelanites; of Pharez, the family of the Pharzites; of Zerah, the family of the Zarhites. And the sons of Pharez were: of Hezron, the family of the Hezronites; of Hamul, the family of the Hamulites.
  6. (of an action continued) further, on
    • c. 84 BCE – 54 BCE, Catullus, Carmina 45.1–4:
      Acmēn Septimius suōs amōrēs
      tenēns in gremiō “Mea” inquit, “Acmē,
      nī te perditē amō atque amāre porrō
      omnēs sum adsiduē parātus annōs []
      Septimius, holding Acme his love
      in his lap said “My Acme,
      if I don’t love you consumately, and am not prepared
      for all the years to come to love you further []
    • 143 CE, Marcus Cornelius Fronto, Epistles to Emperor Marcus Aurelius 1.3:
      Tuus igitur iste amor incultus et sine ratiōne exortus, spērō, cum cedrīs porrō adolēscet et aesculīs.
      Thus, I hope this love of yours, unplanted and sprung up without reason, shall grow on with the cedars and oaks.
  7. in turn
    • c. 84 BCE – 54 BCE, Catullus, Carmina 68.45–46:
      Sed dīcam vōbīs, vōs porrō dīcite multīs
           mīlibus et facite haec charta loquātur anus.
      But I shall tell you, you, in turn, tell it to many
           thousands and let this paper speak in old age.
    • 45 BCE, Cicero, De finibus bonorum et malorum 2.19.61:
      Quod quidem eius factum nisi esset iūre laudātum, nōn esset imitātus quārtō cōnsulātū suō fīlius, neque porrō ex eō nātus cum Pyrrhō bellum gerēns cōnsul cecidisset in proeliō sēque ē continentī genere tertiam victimam reī pūblicae praebuisset.
      Had his [‌Publius Decius Mus'] deed not been deservedly praised, his son wouldn't have imitated him during his fourth consulate, nor would his son in turn have fallen in battle waging war on Pyrrhus and offered himself to the Republic a third victim from his kind.
  8. (somewhat rare) on the other hand, but
    • c. 42 BCE, Sallust, Bellum Catilinae 46.2:
      At illum ingēns cūra atque laetitia simul occupāvēre. Nam laetābātur intellegēns coniūrātiōne patefactā cīvitātem perīculīs ēreptam esse; porrō autem ānxius erat, dubitāns in maxumō scelere tantīs cīvibus dēprehēnsīs, quid factō opus esset.
      But a great worry and joy filled him. For he rejoiced, understanding the city to be outside of peril, the plot being disclosed; on the other hand he was worried, not knowing what should be done, so many citizens having been caught in the greatest crime.
    • c. 360 CE, Hilary of Poitiers, Commentaries on the Gospel of Matthew 6.3 in Patrologia Latina (volume 9), Jacques-Paul Migne (editor), 1844, page 952:
      Arduum in coelum iter hominis est, et aditus angustus ac tenuis: cēterum perditiōnis via lāta est. Īlanc plūrēs obtinent, illam porrō paucī inveniunt.
      Uphill is the road of man to heaven, and the gate is narrow and small: on the other hand, the way of damnation is broad. The latter many conquer, while the former but few find.
    • 4th C. CE, Saint Jerome, Vulgate, Luke 11:19–20:
      Sī autem ego in Beelzebūb ēiciō daemonia, fīliī vestrī in quō ēiciunt? Ideō ipsī iūdicēs vestrī erunt. Porrō sī in digitō Deī ēiciō daemonia, profectō pervenit in vōs rēgnum Deī.
      And if I by Beelzebub cast out devils, by whom do your sons cast them out? therefore shall they be your judges. But if I with the finger of God cast out devils, no doubt the kingdom of God is come upon you.
  9. (very rare, chiefly Late Latin, often with another adverb) (back) then, in the past
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.635–636:
      Altera quod porrō fuerat cecinisse putātur,
      altera ventūrum postmodo quicquid erat.
      One is thought to have sung what was in the past,
      the other whatever was going to come.
    • 5th C. CE, Anianus of Celeda (translator), Homilies on Matthew 2.2, original author: John Chrysostom, in Patrologia Graeca (volume 58), Jacques-Paul Migne (editor), 1862, page 990:
      Ūsque adeō enim istud mīrābile erat, et nūllī ante prōrsus audītum, ut etiam angelī in chorum eārum rērum grātiā collēctī, tōtīus orbis nōmine propter ista glōriam concinerent, faustamque attollerent acclāmātiōnem; et prophetae porrō ante cum admīrātiōne praedīcerent: Quoniam super terram vīsus est, et cum hominibus conversātus est.
      For this [the First Coming] was so wonderful, and unheard to anyone before, that even angels, gathered in a choir by grace of these facts, sung in the name of the whole world for the glory, and raised up an auspicious acclamation; and prophets back then foretold with wonder: Afterwards he was seen upon earth, and conversed with men. (Baruch 3:38)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Old Occitan: por

ReferencesEdit

  • De Vaan, Michiel, “por-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7)‎[1], Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2008, →ISBN, page 481
  • porro in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • porro in Charlton T. Lewis, An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1891
  • porro in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • porrō” in volume X 1, column 2766, line 31 in the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae (TLL Open Access), Berlin (formerly Leipzig): De Gruyter (formerly Teubner), 1900–present

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese porro, from Latin porrum (leek).

NounEdit

porro m (plural porros)

  1. leek (Allium ampeloprasum, syn. Allium porrum, a vegetable)
    Synonyms: alho-francês, alho-porro, alho-poró

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin porrum, possibly through Catalan porro. Compare the inherited form puerro.

NounEdit

porro m (plural porros)

  1. (botany) leek
    Synonym: puerro

Etymology 2Edit

From porra.

AdjectiveEdit

porro (feminine porra, masculine plural porros, feminine plural porras)

  1. (colloquial) stupid

NounEdit

porro m (plural porros)

  1. (Mexico) a member of a criminal shock group, mainly targeting student protesters

Etymology 3Edit

Of uncertain origin.

NounEdit

porro m (plural porros)

  1. joint, reefer
    Synonyms: bate (Honduras), canuto, carruco (Honduras), leño (Honduras)
Derived termsEdit