EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From sociology.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

soc (countable and uncountable, plural socs)

  1. (slang, uncountable) Sociology or social science.
  2. (slang, countable) Upper class youth.
    • 1967, S. E. Hinton, The Outsiders, page 2:
      We get jumped by the Socs. I'm not sure how you spell it, but it's the abbreviation for the Socials, the jet set, the West-side rich kids.
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English soke, sok, soc, from Old English sōcn, from Proto-Germanic *sōkniz.

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

soc

  1. (Britain, law, obsolete) The lord's power or privilege of holding a court in a district, as in manor or lordship; jurisdiction of causes, and the limits of that jurisdiction.
  2. (Britain, obsolete) Liberty or privilege of tenants excused from customary burdens.
  3. (Britain, obsolete) An exclusive privilege formerly claimed by millers of grinding all the corn used within the manor or township in which the mill stands.
Derived termsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for soc in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

soc

  1. (2016 spelling reform) Alternative spelling of sóc

Etymology 2Edit

Compare soca (trunk).

NounEdit

soc m (plural socs)

  1. stump

Etymology 3Edit

Latin soccus (slipper). Compare Spanish zueco.

NounEdit

soc m (plural socs)

  1. clog
    Synonym: esclop

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

soc m or f (plural socs)

  1. souq

Further readingEdit


ChineseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English society.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

soc

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) university society

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *soccus, a word borrowed from Gaulish, from Proto-Celtic *sukkos (compare Middle Irish socc, Welsh swch (plowshare)), literally "pig's snout," from Proto-Indo-European *suH-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

soc m (plural socs)

  1. plowshare
  2. (butchery) Boston butt

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish socc (pig’s snout), from Proto-Celtic *sukkos (pig) (compare Welsh hwch), from Proto-Indo-European *suH-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

soc m (genitive singular soic, nominative plural soic)

  1. snout, muzzle (of an animal)
  2. nozzle
  3. the projecting end of something, such as:
    soc camáintoe of a hurley
    soc eitleáin, roicéid, báid srl.nose of an airplane, rocket, boat etc.
    soc céachtaplowshare
    soc inneonachhorn of an anvil

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
soc shoc
after an, tsoc
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *sukkaz (whence also Old English socc, Old Norse sokkr), from Latin soccus.

NounEdit

soc m

  1. sock

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle High German: soc, socke
    • Alemannic German: Sockä
    • Central Franconian: Sock
    • German: Socke (see there for further descendants)
    • Vilamovian: zok

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sabūcus, variant of sambūcus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

soc m (plural soci)

  1. elder (plant)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit