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See also: Sonar, SONAR, sónar, and soñar

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From SONAR, acronym from sound navigation and ranging.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

sonar (plural sonars)

  1. (nautical) echolocation
  2. (nautical) A device that uses hydrophones (in the same manner as radar) to locate objects underwater.

SynonymsEdit

  • SONAR (acronym of sound navigation and ranging)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan sonar, from Latin sonāre, present active infinitive of sonō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *swen- (to sound, resound).

VerbEdit

sonar (first-person singular present sono, past participle sonat)

  1. to sound, to make a sound
  2. to ring, to buzz

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English sonar.

NounEdit

sonar m (uncountable)

  1. sonar

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English sonar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sonar m (plural sonars)

  1. sonar

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English sonar.

NounEdit

sonar m (plural sonars)

  1. sonar

IcelandicEdit

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Esperanto soni (to sound), French sonner, Italian suonare, Spanish sonar, ultimately from Latin sonō (to make a noise).

VerbEdit

sonar (present tense sonas, past tense sonis, future tense sonos, imperative sonez, conditional sonus)

  1. to ring

ConjugationEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English sonar.

NounEdit

sonar m (plural sonares)

  1. (nautical) sonar (technique and device that uses sound propagation to detect underwater objects)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English sonar.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sǒnaːr/
  • Hyphenation: so‧nar

NounEdit

sònār m (Cyrillic spelling со̀на̄р)

  1. sonar

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Spanish sonar, from Latin sonāre, present active infinitive of sonō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *swen- (to sound, resound).

VerbEdit

sonar (first-person singular present sueno, first-person singular preterite soné, past participle sonado)

  1. to sound, to ring
  2. (figuratively) to ring a bell, to be familiar
    Me suena el nombre, pero no lo ubico.
    His name rings a bell but I can't place him.
  3. (transitive, reflexive, figuratively) to blow one's nose
    Despues de estornudar, me soné la nariz.
    After I sneezed, I blew my nose.
ConjugationEdit
  • Rule: o becomes a ue in stressed syllables.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English sonar.

NounEdit

sonar m (plural sonares)

  1. sonar (a device that uses hydrophones to locate objects underwater)
Alternative formsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

sonar

  1. present tense of sona.

VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sonāre, present active infinitive of sonō. Compare Italian suonare.

VerbEdit

sonar

  1. (transitive) to play, sound

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.