EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally twite, an aphetism of Middle English atwite.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /twɪt/, [tʰw̥ɪt]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

VerbEdit

twit (third-person singular simple present twits, present participle twitting, simple past and past participle twitted)

  1. (transitive) To reproach, blame; to ridicule or tease.
    • 1590, Shakespeare. History of Henry VI, Part II, Act III, Scene I
      "Hath he not twit our sovereign lady here
      With ignominious words, though clerkly couch'd,
      As if she had suborned some to swear
      False allegations to o'erthrow his state? " -
    • 1836, Joanna Baillie, Romiero, Act 3, p.55.
      "Nay, do not twit me now with all the freaks,
      And levities, and gambols charged upon me
      By every lean-faced dame that wears a hood."
    • 1955, Rex Stout, "When a Man Murders...", in Three Witnesses, October 1994 Bantam edition, →ISBN, page 106:
      Mr. Cramer, a policeman, came this morning and twitted me for having let a murderer hoodwink me.
    • 1962 August, “Talking of Trains: Under their hats”, in Modern Railways, page 80:
      Secrecy about B.R. plans for reorganisation and closure of lines and notably some failures to consult with staff representatives concerned with redundancy, are defects with which the railway unions have twitted Dr. Beeching.
    • 2007, Bernard Porter, "Did He Puff his Crimes to Please a Bloodthirsty Readership?", review of Stanley: The Impossible Life of Africa’s Greatest Explorer by Tim Jeal, London Review of Books, 5 April, 29:7, p. 10
      H. R. Fox Bourne, secretary of the Aborigines' Protection Society – often twitted for being an ‘armchair critic’ – wrote in a review of one of Stanley's books []
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Folly of Scoffing at Religion
      This [] these scoffers twitted the Christian with.
    • 1692, Roger L’Estrange, “ (please specify the fable number.) (please specify the name of the fable.)”, in Fables, of Æsop and Other Eminent Mythologists: [], London: [] R[ichard] Sare, [], OCLC 228727523:
      Aesop minds Men of their Errors, without Twitting them for what is Amiss.
  2. (transitive, computing) To ignore or killfile (a user on a bulletin board system).
    • 1995, "Michelle Jackson", Debutante/Question about Tori Shirts (on newsgroup rec.music.tori-amos)
      However, on the Internet BBS's such as Quartz (now dead), Prism, Monsoon, Sunset, ect[sic], someone pulling that kind of crap is likely to get flamed quite fast and twitted before he/she can breathe.
    • 2002, "Chris Hoppman", FidoNet Feed Needed (on newsgroup alt.bbs)
      And no, there is no "thought purification program" that can filter out some folks[sic] obscene ideas that can be expressed w/o written vulgarities. That has to be simply "dealt" with, either by ignoring or twitting the individual that offends habitually.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

twit (plural twits)

  1. A reproach, gibe or taunt.
  2. A foolish or annoying person.
    • 1988, Larry Kramer, Just Say No
      What do you mean, since when did I become such a radical fairy? Since I started knowing twits like you, you twit!
  3. A euphemism for "twat", a contemptible or stupid person.
  4. A person who twitters, i.e. chatters inanely (see usage notes).

Usage notesEdit

In the UK, the word "twit" for a person is usually used in a humorous or affectionate manner.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

twit m (plural twits)

  1. (Quebec, colloquial) twit (foolish person)
  2. a tweet (a message on Twitter)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

twit m (plural twits)

  1. tweet (message on Twitter)