See also: Yow and -yow

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

yow (plural yows)

  1. (dialect) A ewe; a female sheep.

Etymology 2Edit

InterjectionEdit

yow

  1. Expression of pain; ouch.
    Yow! I dropped it on my toe!
  2. Expression of humorous surprise or emphasis.
    You've been divorced four times? Yow!
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


HuaveEdit

NounEdit

yow

  1. water

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Stairs Kreger, Glenn Albert; Scharfe de Stairs, Emily Florence; Olvaries Oviedo, Proceso; Ponce Villanueva, Tereso; Comonfort Llave, Lorenzo (1981) Diccionario huave de San Mateo del Mar (Serie de vocabularios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 24)‎[1] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 184–185

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ēow, from Proto-Germanic *izwiz. Initial /j/ is by analogy with ye.

PronounEdit

yow (nominative ye)

  1. Second-person plural object pronoun: you (plural).
  2. (formal) second-person singular object pronoun: you (singular).

DescendantsEdit

  • English: you
  • Scots: you

ReferencesEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain; most likely from Old English ēow.

PronounEdit

yow (personal, emphatic)

  1. (South Scots) you

See alsoEdit


WhitesandsEdit

NounEdit

yow

  1. turtle

ReferencesEdit


WolofEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

PronounEdit

yow

  1. you (second-person singular subject pronoun)

See alsoEdit


YapeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

yow

  1. Third-person dual pronoun; they two

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Jensen, John Thayer (1977) Yapese Reference Grammar, Honolulu: The University press of Hawaii, pages 132-135