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DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier -ken, from Middle Dutch -ken, -kin, -kijn, apparently representing Proto-Germanic *-ukīną, a double diminutive, from *-ukaz. The standard Dutch -tje and its variants are derived from -ke(n) through palatalization. Cognate with German -chen, Low German -ken, English -kin, -ock.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ke n (plural -kes)

  1. Appended to a noun, making it diminutive.

EstonianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-ke (genitive -kese, partitive -kest)

  1. A noun suffix that builds diminutives from nouns.
  • kivi (stone) → kivike (a small stone)

Usage notesEdit

Diminutives can be stacked, yielding -kene, -keseke, -kesekene. The longer forms are rarely used.

DeclensionEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ke

  1. Forms diminutive forms of nouns.
    aalto (wave)aalloke (wavelet)
    siipi (wing)siiveke (aileron)
    lause (sentence)lauseke (expression; phrase)
  2. Forms nouns from verbs, often to describe the result of an action.
    elää (to live)eläke (pension)
    seisahtaa (to come to a standstill)seisake (railway stop)
  3. (rare) Forms nouns from adjectives.
    lämmin (warm)lämmike (something used to warm up)

Derived termsEdit


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • § 257 ke-sanojen koostumus ja merkitys, Iso suomen kielioppi, 2004[1]

AnagramsEdit


German Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • -ken (in other dialects)

EtymologyEdit

Compare German -chen, Dutch -ke.

SuffixEdit

-ke (noun plural -kes)

  1. (Low Prussian) Suffix used to form the diminutive of nouns and hypocoristic forms of proper nouns and other parts of speech.
    Brotkebread
    AnkeAnnie
    GottkeGod
    kommkecome (second-person singular present imperative, hypocoristic)

ReferencesEdit

  • Erhard Riemann (et al.), Preußisches Wörterbuch: deutsche Mundarten Ost- und Westpreußens (1974)
  • A. Treichel, Dialectische Räthsel, Reime und Märchen aus dem Ermlande, in Altpreussische Monatsschrift neue Folge. Der Preussischen Provinzial-Blätter vierte Folge, volume 27 (1890), edited by Rudolf Reicke and Ernst Wichert, pp. 327–332; on p. 332:
    Aus Braunsberg wird mir noch gemeldet (Pfr. Preuschoff), daß dort und in der Umgegend die Verkleinerungs-Endsilbe -chen und -lein, erstere in -ke verplattdeutscht, überaus häufig und überall angehängt werden, wie z. B. Jacke! nêke! kommke! Ebenso an Personennamen. Man hört die Schulkinder ihren Gefährten also zurufen: Albrechtke, Ehmke, Eadmannke (Erdmannchen), Wulfke u. s. w.
  • H. Frischbier, Preußisches Wörterbuch. Ost- und westpreussische Provinzialismen, volume 1, A–K (1882)
  • H. Frischbier, Preußisches Wörterbuch. Ost- und westpreussische Provinzialismen, volume 2, L–Z (1883)

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finno-Ugric. Compare Finnish -kka and Estonian -ke.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ke

  1. (diminutive suffix) Added to a word to express smallness, youth, unimportance, or endearment. When added to present participles, it can also express the instrument or place of the action indicated in the base word.
    egy (one)egyke (only child)
    egér (mouse)egérke (tiny mouse)
    ül (to sit)ülő (sitting)ülőke (seat, small seat)

Usage notesEdit

  • (diminutive suffix) Harmonic variants:
    -ka is added to back vowel words
    -ke is added to front vowel words

Derived termsEdit


See alsoEdit


ZuluEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

SuffixEdit

-ke

  1. now
  2. and so
  3. then
  4. very well
    Yeboke.
    Yes, very well.

Usage notesEdit

The suffix is usually affixed to the first word of the sentence.

ReferencesEdit