See also: bidé, bidè, bidê, bidę, and bídě

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English biden, from Old English bīdan (to stay, continue, live, remain, delay; wait for, await, expect; endure, experience, find; attain, obtain; own), from Proto-Germanic *bīdaną (to wait), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰéydʰeti, from *bʰeydʰ- (to command, persuade, compel, trust). Latinate cognates (via PIE) include faith and fidelity.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bide (third-person singular simple present bides, present participle biding, simple past bode or bided, past participle bided or bidden)

  1. (transitive, chiefly dialectal) To bear; to endure; to tolerate.
    • c. 1570, Anonymous, Sir Clyomon and Sir Clamydes
      And doubting naught right courteous all, in your accustomed wont: And gentle ears, our author he is prest to bide the brunt
  2. (intransitive, archaic or dialectal) To dwell or reside in a location; to abide.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost:
      All knees to thee shall bow of them that bide / In heaven or earth, or under earth, in hell.
  3. (intransitive, archaic or dialectal) To wait; to be in expectation; to stay; to remain.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To wait for; to await.

Usage notesEdit

  • The verb has been replaced by abide in Standard English for almost all its uses, and is now rarely found outside the expression bide one's time.

QuotationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BasqueEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

bide inan

  1. path, track, way
  2. way, manner, method, procedure
  3. journey
  4. line
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

AdverbEdit

bide

  1. apparently

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Danish bitæ, from Old Norse bíta, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną, cognate with English bite, German bissen, Dutch bijten. The Germanic verb goes back to Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split), cf. Latin findō (to cleave), fissiō (breaking up) (hence fission).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bide (imperative bid, infinitive at bide, present tense bider, past tense bed, perfect tense har bidt)

  1. bite (to cut off a piece by clamping the teeth)

InflectionEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From bidon.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bide m (plural bides)

  1. fiasco, flop
  2. (colloquial) paunch, belly
  3. (uncountable) Something fake.

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

bide

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ビデ

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English bīdan, from Proto-Germanic.

VerbEdit

bide

  1. to dwell, to live
    Tae bide somewhaur: to dwell somewhere.
    Tae bide: to dwell.
    Whaur dae ye bide?: where do you live?
  2. to stay, to remain
    "Bide and fecht!" (traditional Scots phrase meaning "Stay and fight!")

Derived termsEdit

bydand


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bidet.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bǐdeː/
  • Hyphenation: bi‧de

NounEdit

bìdē m (Cyrillic spelling бѝде̄)

  1. bidet

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • bide” in Hrvatski jezični portal