See also: Bode, bøde, bodě, bodę, and bódé

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Verb from Middle English boden, from Old English bodian (announce, foretell), from Proto-Germanic *budōną (to proclaim, announce, lere, instruct), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewdʰ- (to be awake, perceive fully). See bid.

Noun from Middle English bod, from Old English bod, from Proto-Germanic *budą (message, offer).

Since 1740 also a shortening of forebode.

VerbEdit

bode (third-person singular simple present bodes, present participle boding, simple past and past participle boded)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To indicate by signs, as future events; to be an omen of; to portend or foretell.
    Synonyms: portend, presage, foreshow
    • 1610–1611 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene i]:
      O heaven, O earth, bear witness to this sound,
      And crown what I profess with kind event
      If I speak true; if hollowly invert
      What best is boded me to mischief: I,
      Beyond all limit of what else i' th' world,
      Do love, prize, honour you.
  2. (intransitive, followed by "well", "ill", "no good", etc.) To betoken or augur something good or bad that will happen in the future.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

bode (plural bodes)

  1. An omen; a foreshadowing.
    c. 1380s, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Parliament of Fowles
    The oule eek, that of dethe the bode bringeth.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English bod, from Old English bod (a bidding), from Proto-Germanic *budą (a bidding, offer).

Cognate with Swedish bud, Dutch bod, Icelandic boð, Faroese boð, Norwegian Nynorsk bod, Norwegian Bokmål bud. Compare also Old Saxon gibod, German Gebot. See bid.

NounEdit

bode (plural bodes)

  1. (obsolete or dialect) A bid; an offer.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English bode, from Old English boda (messenger, forerunner), from Proto-West Germanic [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *budô (messenger). Cognate with Dutch bode (messenger, harbinger), German Bote (messenger).

NounEdit

bode (plural bodes)

  1. A herald; a messenger.
    • 1848, [Edward Bulwer-Lytton], chapter III, in Harold, the Last of the Saxon Kings; [], volume I, 2nd edition, London: Richard Bentley, [], OCLC 852824569, book II (Lanfranc the Scholar), page 138:
      [T]he fame of the Duke's coming was sent abroad by the bodes or messengers, despatched to prepare the towns through which he was to pass for an arrival sooner than expected, []

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English bod, abod (a stopping).

NounEdit

bode (plural bodes)

  1. A stop; a halting; delay.

Etymology 5Edit

Inflected form of bide.

VerbEdit

bode

  1. simple past tense of bide

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


ChichewaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English body.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bóde class 5 (plural mabóde class 6)

  1. body of a lorry

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bode

  1. vocative singular of bod

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch bōde, from Old Dutch bodo, from Proto-Germanic *budô.

NounEdit

bode m or f (plural boden or bodes, diminutive bodetje n)

  1. messenger, deliverer
    Synonym: boodschapper
  2. servant
    Synonyms: bediende, knecht
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

bode

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of bieden

Further readingEdit

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown. Probably from a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bode m (plural bodes)

  1. buck, billy goat
    Synonym: castrón
  2. goatskin
    Synonym: fol

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • bode” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • bode” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • bode” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • bode” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • bode” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.



LaboyaEdit

VerbEdit

bode

  1. (intransitive) to stop

ReferencesEdit

  • Rina, A. Dj.; Kabba, John Lado B. (2011), “bode”, in Kamus Bahasa Lamboya, Kabupaten Sumba Bakat [Dictionary of Lamboya Language, West Sumba Regency], Waikabubak: Dinas Kebudayaan dan Pariwisata, Kabupaten Sumba Bakat, page 10

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch bodo, from Proto-Germanic *budô.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bōde m

  1. messenger
  2. servant

InflectionEdit

Weak masculine
Singular Plural
Nominative bōde bōden
Accusative bōde bōden
Genitive bōden bōden
Dative bōde bōden

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: bode

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English boda.

NounEdit

bode

  1. messenger
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

bode

  1. Alternative form of bede

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

bode

  1. past participle of by

PlautdietschEdit

VerbEdit

bode

  1. to bathe, to lave

PortugueseEdit

 
bode

EtymologyEdit

Unknown. Probably from a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia. Or, possibly of Germanic origin, borrowed through Spanish bode.[1]

PronunciationEdit

 

  • (Northeast Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbɔ.di/
  • Hyphenation: bo‧de

NounEdit

bode m (plural bodes)

  1. goat buck, billy goat
    Synonym: cabrão

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ bode” in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913

Serbo-CroatianEdit

VerbEdit

bode (Cyrillic spelling боде)

  1. third-person singular present of bosti

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish bote, of Germanic origin, from Proto-Germanic *bukkaz, see also German Bock.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: bo‧de

NounEdit

bode m (plural bodes)

  1. goat buck
    Synonym: cabrón

Further readingEdit

  • bode”, in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014
  • Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

bode

  1. dative singular of bod

YorubaEdit

 
Bodè

EtymologyEdit

From ibi +‎ o +‎ .

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bodè

  1. city gate
    Synonym: ibodè
  2. (by extension) a point of entry; entrance
    Synonyms: àbáwọlé, ibodè

Derived termsEdit