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See also: Carmine and carminé

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EnglishEdit

 
Carmine ornament on the ceiling of a chapel

EtymologyEdit

From French carmin, from irregular Medieval Latin carminium, itself from Arabic قِرْمِز(qirmiz, crimson, kermes) (from Sanskrit कृमिज (kṛmija, produced by worms), from कृमि (kṛ́mi, worm, insect)), plus or with influence from Latin minium.

NounEdit

carmine (countable and uncountable, plural carmines)

  1. A purplish-red pigment, made from dye obtained from the cochineal beetle; carminic acid or any of its derivatives.
    • 1967, Time, "The Case of the Dubious Dye," 6 January, 1967, [1]
      Cases of cubana salmonellosis in three other states were traced to carmine red, and supplies were called in. [] But authorities have been checking other places for carmine red, knowing that it is a favorite coloring in candy, chewing gum, ice cream, cough syrups and drugs. Manufacturers like to use it because of a legal quirk: being a natural rather than a synthetic product, it does not have to be mentioned on labels.
  2. A purplish-red colour, resembling that pigment.
    • 1854, Henry David Thoreau, Walden, New York: Thomas Y. Crowell & Co., 1910, Chapter XIV, p. 347, [2]
      He wore a great coat in midsummer, being affected with the trembling delirium, and his face was the color of carmine.
    • c. 1862, Emily Dickinson, in The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, edited by Thomas H. Johnson, Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1960, pp. 225-6,
      I am alive—I guess— / The Branches on my Hand / Are full of Morning Glory— / And at my finger's end— / The Carmine—tingles warm—
    • 1920, F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise, Chapter 5, [3]
      He pictured himself in an adobe house in Mexico, half-reclining on a rug-covered couch, his slender, artistic fingers closed on a cigarette while he listened to guitars strumming melancholy undertones to an age-old dirge of Castile and an olive-skinned, carmine-lipped girl caressed his hair.
    • 1938, George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia, Chapter 4, [4]
      [] the dawn breaking behind the hill-tops in our rear, the first narrow streaks of gold, like swords slitting the darkness, and then the growing light and the seas of carmine cloud stretching away into inconceivable distances []
    • 1987, Toni Morrison, Beloved, New York: Vintage, 2004, p. 33,
      The velvet I seen was brown, but in Boston they got all colors. Carmine. That means red but when you talk about velvet you got to say 'carmine.'
    carmine colour:  

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

carmine

  1. Of the purplish red colour shade carmine.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

LatinEdit

NounEdit

carmine

  1. ablative singular of carmen

ReferencesEdit