See also: Versus, vérsus, verŝus, and vēršus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English versus, borrowed from Latin versus (against, turned), past participle of vertere (to turn, change, overthrow, destroy).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

versus

  1. Against; in opposition to.
    Synonyms: vs, vs., v (abbreviations)
    It is the Packers versus the Steelers in the Super Bowl.
  2. Compared with, as opposed to.
    • 2012 November 7, Matt Bai, “Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds”, in New York Times[1]:
      In polling by the Pew Research Center in November 2008, fully half the respondents thought the two parties would cooperate more in the coming year, versus only 36 percent who thought the climate would grow more adversarial.
    • 2005, Robert E. Weiss, Modeling Longitudinal Data, Springer, →ISBN, page 104:
      If, for example, we select random people entering a workout gym, versus if we pick random people entering a hospital, we will get very different samples.
  3. (law) Bringing a legal action against, as used in the title of a court case in which the first party indicates the plaintiff (or appellant or the like), and the second indicates the defendant (or respondent or the like).
    Synonyms: v, v. (abbreviation)
    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kans.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin versus

PrepositionEdit

versus

  1. versus

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin versus. Doublet of verso, which is inherited.

PrepositionEdit

versus

  1. versus

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From earlier vorsus, from Proto-Italic *worssos, perfect passive participle of vertō (to turn).

Alternative formsEdit

ParticipleEdit

versus (feminine versa, neuter versum); first/second-declension participle

  1. turned, changed, having been turned
DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative versus versa versum versī versae versa
Genitive versī versae versī versōrum versārum versōrum
Dative versō versō versīs
Accusative versum versam versum versōs versās versa
Ablative versō versā versō versīs
Vocative verse versa versum versī versae versa
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Adverbial use of versus (turned).

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

versus (not comparable)

  1. towards, turned to or in the direction of, facing
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Action noun from vertō + tus.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

versus m (genitive versūs); fourth declension

  1. a furrow (turned earth)
  2. (transf.) a line, row
    1. (partic.) a line of writing, a verse
      Si versus horum duorum poetarum neglegetis, magna parte litterarum carebitis.
      If you neglect the verses of these two poets, you will miss a great part of literature.
  3. a land measure (= πλέθρον (pléthron))
    • 1st century BCE, Marcus Terentius Varro, Rerum rusticarum libri III (Agricultural Topics in Three Books). Liber I, X:
      Ille, Modos, quibus metirentur rura, alius alios constituit. Nam in Hispania ulteriore metiuntur iugis, in Campania versibus, apud nos in agro Romano ac Latino iugeris. Iugum vocant, quod iuncti boves uno die exarare possint.
      Each country has its own method of measuring land. Thus in farther Spain the unit of measure is the iugum, in Campania the versus, with us here in the district of Rome and in Latium the iugerum. The iugum is the amount of land which a yoke of oxen can plough in a day; the versus is an area 100 feet square; 2 the iugerum an area containing two square actus.
  4. (dance) a turn, step
DeclensionEdit

Fourth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative versus versūs
Genitive versūs versuum
Dative versuī versibus
Accusative versum versūs
Ablative versū versibus
Vocative versus versūs
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Perfect passive participle of verrō (to sweep).

ParticipleEdit

versus (feminine versa, neuter versum); first/second-declension participle

  1. swept
DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative versus versa versum versī versae versa
Genitive versī versae versī versōrum versārum versōrum
Dative versō versō versīs
Accusative versum versam versum versōs versās versa
Ablative versō versā versō versīs
Vocative verse versa versum versī versae versa

ReferencesEdit

  • versus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • versus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • versus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • versus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to sing the praises of some one (not canere aliquem: alicuius laudes versibus persequi
    • to celebrate some one's exploits in song: alicuius res gestas versibus ornare, celebrare
    • (ambiguous) in all directions: quoquo versus; in omnes partes
    • (ambiguous) to advance in the direction of Rome: Romam versus proficisci
    • (ambiguous) to write poetry: versus facere, scribere
    • (ambiguous) to write poetry with facility: carmina , versus fundere (De Or. 3. 50)
    • (ambiguous) to recite a poem, line with appropriate action: carmen, versum agere

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Latin versus.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

versus

  1. versus (in opposition to)
    Synonym: kontra

Further readingEdit

  • versus in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • versus in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

PrepositionEdit

versus

  1. Alternative spelling of vérsus

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English versus.[1]

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

versus

  1. versus
    Esta noche transmitiremos a Alberto del Río versus John Cena en vivo.
    Tonight, we'll be broadcasting Alberto del Rio versus John Cena live.

Usage notesEdit

This word is sometimes frowned upon as an anglicism, with the suggestion that contra or the conjunction y should be used instead.

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ versus” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.