Translingual

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Symbol

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hun

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Hungarian.

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Clipping of honey with pronunciation spelling.

Noun

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hun (plural huns)

  1. (informal) Alternative spelling of hon (affectionate abbreviation of honey)
  2. (UK, slang) A woman perceived as basic, brash, working class and fond of alcohol.
    • 2023 January 25, Laura Craik, “They’re glamorous, ageless and British – the rise of the high-end hun”, in The Telegraph[1]:
      Answer: you are a hun – but a high-end hun, one who knows her wine, her music, her interiors and her labels, and whose reluctance to do Dry January, or go vegan makes her such great company, this month and every month.
    • 2024 March 29, Louis Staples, “Natalie Cassidy: ‘I’m very proud to be a hun’”, in i[2]:
      It’s no wonder she’s become a central figure in “hun culture” – an online subculture that idolises a certain strata of famous working-class British women, while also taking the mick out of her leopard print kettle and weakness for a premixed gin-in-a-tin cocktail.
  3. (slang) A woman involved in a multi-level marketing scheme, especially one who pushes it on social media.
    • 2019 July 10, Jessica Lindsay, “Hunzoning is the trend that sees you going from friend to MLM recruit”, in Metro[3]:
      This corporate love-bombing can serve a hun well, bagging them new downlines and potentially more money (MLMs are renowned for extremely low pay).
    • 2024 April 18, Aimee Pearcy, “Why Reddit and TikTok are hating on MLM 'huns'”, in Business Insider[4]:
      Instead of blaming MLM "huns," we should direct our anger at the companies that are knowingly putting so many people in debt and alienating them from their communities.
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Short for Hungarian partridge.

Noun

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hun (plural huns)

  1. A grey partridge.

Etymology 3

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Noun

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hun (plural huns)

  1. Alternative form of hoon (Indian gold coin)

Anagrams

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Alemannic German

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle High German hunt, from Old High German hunt, from Proto-Germanic *hundaz. Cognate with German Hund, Dutch hond, English hound, Icelandic hundur.

Noun

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hun m

  1. (Formazza) dog

References

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Breton

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Noun

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hun ?

  1. sleep

Catalan

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Etymology

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Learned borrowing from Late Latin Hunni.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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hun m (plural huns, feminine huna)

  1. Hun
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Further reading

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Danish

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Etymology

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From Old Norse hón (she), from Proto-Norse *ᚺᚨᚾᚢ (*hanu), the feminine form, with u-umlaut, of *ᚺᚨᚾᚨᛉ (*hanaʀ) (= Danish han (he), Old Norse hann).

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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hun (objective case hende, possessive hendes)

  1. (personal) she

See also

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References

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Noun

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hun c (singular definite hunnen, plural indefinite hunner)

  1. female, she

Declension

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References

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Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Originally a mere spelling variant of hen.[1]

Possessive hun started replacing haar from the 15th century, first only for masculine and neuter plural.

Pronoun

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hun (personal)

  1. The dative case of the third-person plural personal pronoun: them, to them.
  2. (proscribed) The accusative case of the third-person plural personal pronoun: them.
Usage notes
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The difference between hen (as direct object) and hun (as indirect object) does not stem from actual language usage, but was created artificially by the prescriptive grammarian Christiaen van Heule in the 17th century in an attempt to differentiate between the accusative (direct object) and dative case (indirect object), a distinction that was then commonly made in the definite article and certain pronouns, but not the personal pronouns.

In practice, hen and hun have been used interchangeably in Modern Dutch since the language has lost its grammatical case system. Many native speakers are not aware or have trouble remembering when to use one over the other, in part because of the rule's artificiality, in part because the distinction in form between the accusative and dative case has not been preserved anywhere else in the language. As a consequence, it is common to hear sentences where they are used in the exactly opposite way from van Heule's rule; for example:

  • Hij heeft hun verraden. (“He has betrayed them.”)
  • Ze zijn met hun uitgegaan. (“They have gone out with them.”)
  • Ik heb het hen gegeven. (“I have given it to them.”)

When the pronoun is unstressed, the problem can be circumvented by using the reduced form ze:

  • Hij heeft ze verraden.
  • Ze zijn met ze uitgegaan.
  • Ik heb het ze gegeven.

For more information, see the article in the Dutch Wikipedia.

Pronoun

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hun (personal) (dependent possessive) (independent possessive hunne)

  1. The third-person plural possessive pronoun: their.
    Ken je hun broer?
    Do you know their brother?
Inflection
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Etymology 2

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Likely a replacement of or based on dialectal Dutch hullie or a variant thereof, which is a contraction of hunlieden or hunlui, a compound of hun ("them") + lieden or lui (both meaning "men, people"), which then translates roughly into "them-people". Possibly reinfluenced by or confused with the possessive hun. This etymology explains why usage of hun occurs only when referring to people, never to objects. It's similar to dialectal zun often used colloquially in the Belgian province of Antwerp, which is a contraction of ze ("they") + hun ("them"), and which is also only used for people. Also compare Afrikaans hulle, which also stems from hunlui, but is now used also for things. For more information, see the article in the Dutch Wikipedia.

Pronoun

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hun (personal)

  1. (proscribed, regiolectal, Netherlands) The nominative case of the third-person plural personal pronoun: they (only referring to people).
    Synonyms: zijlui, zijlieden
Usage notes
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  • The use of hun as a subject is considered incorrect or substandard by most speakers, both in written and spoken language, and only occurs in the Netherlands.
  • For a 3rd person plural pronoun referring to people only, zijlui or zijlieden can be used instead.

References

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  1. ^ van der Sijs, Nicoline, editor (2010), “hun”, in Etymologiebank, Meertens Institute:In het meervoud van het persoonlijk voornaamwoord voor de 3e persoon bestond deze vorm in het Middelnederlands in diverse varianten, waarvan hen en hun de belangrijkste waren. Wrsch. waren dit uitsluitend spellingvarianten van het woord /hən/.

Hokkien

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For pronunciation and definitions of hun – see (“to divide; to separate; to distribute; to allocate; to assign; to allot; etc.”).
(This term is the pe̍h-ōe-jī form of ).

Hungarian

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Latin Hunni.[1][2]

Adjective

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hun (not comparable)

  1. Hunnic, Hunnish (of or relating to the Huns)
Declension
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Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative hun hunok
accusative hunt hunokat
dative hunnak hunoknak
instrumental hunnal hunokkal
causal-final hunért hunokért
translative hunná hunokká
terminative hunig hunokig
essive-formal hunként hunokként
essive-modal
inessive hunban hunokban
superessive hunon hunokon
adessive hunnál hunoknál
illative hunba hunokba
sublative hunra hunokra
allative hunhoz hunokhoz
elative hunból hunokból
delative hunról hunokról
ablative huntól hunoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
huné hunoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
hunéi hunokéi

Noun

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hun (plural hunok)

  1. Hun (a member of a nomadic tribe)
Declension
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Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative hun hunok
accusative hunt hunokat
dative hunnak hunoknak
instrumental hunnal hunokkal
causal-final hunért hunokért
translative hunná hunokká
terminative hunig hunokig
essive-formal hunként hunokként
essive-modal
inessive hunban hunokban
superessive hunon hunokon
adessive hunnál hunoknál
illative hunba hunokba
sublative hunra hunokra
allative hunhoz hunokhoz
elative hunból hunokból
delative hunról hunokról
ablative huntól hunoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
huné hunoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
hunéi hunokéi
Possessive forms of hun
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. hunom hunjaim
2nd person sing. hunod hunjaid
3rd person sing. hunja hunjai
1st person plural hununk hunjaink
2nd person plural hunotok hunjaitok
3rd person plural hunjuk hunjaik

Etymology 2

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From hol.

Adverb

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hun

  1. (dialectal) Alternative form of hol (where).
Derived terms
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References

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  1. ^ hun in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)
  2. ^ hun in Tótfalusi, István. Magyar etimológiai nagyszótár (’Hungarian Comprehensive Dictionary of Etymology’). Budapest: Arcanum Adatbázis, 2001; Arcanum DVD Könyvtár →ISBN

Further reading

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  • (Hun, Hunnic): hun in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (where [dialectal]): hun in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Iu Mien

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Etymology

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From Chinese (MC hjwon).

Noun

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hun 

  1. garden

Label

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Etymology

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Compare Tolai vudu and Patpatar hudu.

Noun

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hun

  1. banana

References

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  • Mosel, Ulrike (1980) Tolai and Tok Pisin: the influence of the substratum on the development of New Guinea Pidgin (Pacific Linguistics; Series B, no. 73)‎[5], Canberra: Australian National University, →ISBN

Malay

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Noun

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hun (plural hun-hun, informal 1st possessive hunku, 2nd possessive hunmu, 3rd possessive hunnya)

  1. A unit of weight equal to one hundredth of a tahil.

Mandarin

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Romanization

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hun (hun5hun0, Zhuyin ˙ㄏㄨㄣ)

  1. Nonstandard spelling of hūn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of hún.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of hǔn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of hùn.

Usage notes

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  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Middle English

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Noun

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hun

  1. Alternative form of hund (hundred)

Middle Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Numeral

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hun

  1. h-prothesized form of un

Mizo

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Noun

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hun

  1. time

North Frisian

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Etymology

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From Old Frisian hond. Cognates include Mooring North Frisian hönj and West Frisian hân.

Noun

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hun f (plural hunen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) (anatomy) hand
    a rocht(er)/lacht(er) hun
    the right/left hand

Norwegian Bokmål

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Etymology 1

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From Danish hun, from Old Norse hón.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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hun (accusative henne, genitive hennes)

  1. she
Derived terms
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See also

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  • ho (Nynorsk)
  • hoe (Nynorsk)

Etymology 2

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Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

From Old Norse húnn (a die).

Alternative forms

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Noun

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hun m (definite singular hunen, indefinite plural huner, definite plural hunene)

  1. back board

References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology 1

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hun

From Old Norse húnn (bear cub),[1] from Proto-Germanic *hūnaz.

Noun

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hun m (definite singular hunen, indefinite plural hunar, definite plural hunane)

  1. a bear cub
    Synonym: bjørnunge

Etymology 2

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
 
bakhunar

From Old Norse húnn (die).[1]

Alternative forms

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Noun

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hun m (definite singular hunen, indefinite plural hunar, definite plural hunane)

  1. back part of a log that might still be used as a plank

Etymology 3

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From Old Norse húnar, húnir pl.

Noun

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hun m (definite singular hunen, indefinite plural hunar, definite plural hunane)

  1. a Hun (a member of a nomadic tribe from Central Asia)
    Synonym: hunar

References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 “hun” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  2. ^ Language Council of Norway, Spelling decisions since 2012 (in Norwegian, retrieved 12.22.20)
  • “hun”, in Norsk Ordbok: ordbok over det norske folkemålet og det nynorske skriftmålet, Oslo: Samlaget, 1950-2016

Old Galician-Portuguese

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Article

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hun

  1. Alternative form of ũu

Old High German

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Proper noun

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hun

  1. manuscript spelling of Hūn, nominative singular of Hūni

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French Huns, from Latin Hunni.

Noun

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hun m (plural huni)

  1. Hun

Declension

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Tetum

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Etymology

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From *pun, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *puqun, compare Malay pohon.

Noun

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hun

  1. bottom, base
  2. beginning
  3. origin

Vietnamese

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Typical Central and Southern Vietnamese retention of medial *u, which often developed into ‹ô› (or ‹o›) in Northern dialects; later strengthened with the use of "slang" to avoid awkward situations. Compare rún vs. rốn, thúi vs. thối.

Verb

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hun ()

  1. Central Vietnam and Southern Vietnam form of hôn (to kiss)
Usage notes
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  • The Northern form with [o] is pretty much never used in daily speech by speakers of Central and Southern dialects, although they might choose to use it in formal writing.
Synonyms
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Etymology 2

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Non-Sino-Vietnamese reading of Chinese (SV: huân).

Verb

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hun (, , )

  1. to smoke (to preserve or prepare (food) for consumption by treating with smoke)
Derived terms
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Derived terms

Anagrams

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Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Lexicalised h-prothesised form of un.

Pronoun

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hun

  1. (with possessive determiner) self
    Synonym: hunan
    fy hunmyself
    ei hunhimself, herself
    ein hunourselves
  2. (with possessive determiner preceding both itself and the noun) own
    Synonym: hunan
    fy ngeiriau fy hunmy own words
    ei syniad ei hunhis/her own idea
    ein cartref ein hunour own home

Usage notes

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  • Hun tends to be more common in the north and synonymous hunan in the south, although plural hunain is also found in north at times.

Personal forms

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Numeral

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hun

  1. h-prothesized form of un
    ei hun ei hunher own (one)
    (Compare: ei un ei hunhis own (one))

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
un unchanged unchanged hun
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Etymology 2

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From Proto-Brythonic *hʉn, from Proto-Celtic *sounos, from Proto-Indo-European *swépnos (sleep).

Noun

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hun f (plural hunau, not mutable)

  1. sleep
Derived terms
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References

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  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “hun”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Yoruba

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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hùn

  1. (Ikalẹ) to sleep
    Kítà é hùn.The dog is sleeping.

Derived terms

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Yucatec Maya

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Etymology

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From Proto-Mayan *juun.

Pronunciation

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Numeral

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hun

  1. one

Derived terms

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References

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  • Beltrán de Santa Rosa María, Pedro (1746) Arte de el idioma maya reducido a succintas reglas, y semilexicon yucateco (in Spanish), Mexico: Por la Biuda de D. Joseph Bernardo de Hogal, page 152:Hun. Vno. 1.
  • Montgomery, John (2004) Maya-English, English-Maya (Yucatec) Dictionary & Phrasebook, New York: Hippocrene Books, Inc., →ISBN, pages 58, 203