See also: dens.

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɛnz/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛnz

Etymology 1Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

dens

  1. plural of den

VerbEdit

dens

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of den.

Etymology 2Edit

 
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Borrowed from Latin dens (a tooth). Doublet of dent and tooth.

NounEdit

dens (plural dentes)

  1. (anatomy) A toothlike process projecting from the anterior end of the centrum of the axis vertebra on which the atlas vertebra rotates.
    Synonym: odontoid process
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin dēnsus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dens (feminine densa, masculine plural densos, feminine plural denses)

  1. dense, thick

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


CornishEdit

NounEdit

dens m pl

  1. plural of dans (tooth)

ReferencesEdit

  • Cornish-English Dictionary from Maga's Online Dictionary
  • 2018, Akademi Kernewek Gerlyver Kernewek (FSS) Cornish Dictionary (SWF) (2018 edition, p.31)

DanishEdit

PronounEdit

dens (nominative den, objective den)

  1. its, possessive form of den

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

 
Dēns (a tooth)

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *dents, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dónts. Cognates include Ancient Greek ὀδούς (odoús), Sanskrit दत् (dát), Lithuanian dantìs, Old English tōþ (English tooth), Armenian ատամ (atam).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dēns m (genitive dentis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) a tooth
    • 1803, Joanne Nep. Alber, Interpretatio Sacrae Scripturae per Omnes Veteris et Novi Testamenti Libros[1], 30:14, page 172:
      prō dentibus gladiōs habent
      They have swords for teeth.
  2. (metonymically) a tooth, point, spike, prong, tine, fluke, or any tooth-like projection
  3. (figuratively) tooth of envy, envy, ill will
    1. tooth of a destroying power
  This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

InflectionEdit

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative dēns dentēs
Genitive dentis dentium
Dative dentī dentibus
Accusative dentem dentēs
dentīs
Ablative dente dentibus
Vocative dēns dentēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • dens”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • dens”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dens in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • dens in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • dens”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dens”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronounEdit

dens (nominative den, oblique den)

  1. its, possessive form of den

See alsoEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contraction of the Latin de intus.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

dens

  1. (Gascony) in, within, inside

ReferencesEdit

  • Patric Guilhemjoan, Diccionari elementari occitan-francés francés-occitan (gascon), 2005, Orthez, per noste, 2005, →ISBN, page 54.

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French dense, Latin densus. Compare the inherited doublet des.

AdjectiveEdit

dens m or n (feminine singular densă, masculine plural denși, feminine and neuter plural dense)

  1. dense

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit