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See also: MIG, MiG, Mig, and míg

Contents

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin medius.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mig (feminine mitja, masculine plural migs or mitjos, feminine plural mitges)

  1. middle
  2. half

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mik, from Proto-Germanic *mek, from Proto-Indo-European *me (me).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

mig (nominative jeg, possessive min)

  1. (personal) first person singular accusative personal pronoun; me
  2. (personal, nonstandard, when before other terms in a list) first person singular nominative personal pronoun; I
    Mig og min bror tog til stranden.
    Me and my brother went to the beach.

Usage notesEdit

Also used as reflexive pronoun.

See alsoEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old Norse mik

PronounEdit

mig

  1. (personal) accusative form of ég; me
    Þú drapst mig.
    You killed me.
  2. myself
    Ég brenndi mig.
    I burnt myself.

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *migъ.

NounEdit

mȋg m (Cyrillic spelling ми̑г)

  1. wink
  2. hint
  3. cue

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • mej (strongly colloquial)

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mik, from Proto-Germanic, from Proto-Indo-European *me (me).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

mig

  1. me (objective case)
    Såg du mig aldrig där?
    Did you never see me there?
    Kan du lära mig att jonglera?
    Can you teach me how to juggle?
  2. reflexive case of jag; compare myself
    Jag skar mig på kniven.
    I cut myself on the knife.

Usage notesEdit

Note that some verbs have special senses when used reflexively. For example, do not confuse jag lär mig att... ("I learn to...") [reflexive] with du lär mig att... ("you teach me to...") and jag lär mig själv att... ("I teach myself to..."). Here, lär means teach(es) if it is not reflexive, but learn(s) if it is reflexive. Hence the need for the separate pronoun "mig själv" to be used when object and subject agree, but the verb nevertheless should not be used in the reflexive case.

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit