EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French modal, from Medieval Latin modālis (pertaining to a mode), from Latin modus (mode); see mode. Compare to French, Spanish, and Portuguese modal and Italian modale.

PronunciationEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

AdjectiveEdit

modal (comparative more modal, superlative most modal)

  1. Of, or relating to a mode or modus.
  2. (grammar) Of, relating to, or describing the mood of a clause.
  3. (music) Of, relating to, or composed in the musical modi by which an octave is divided, associated with emotional moods in Ancient — and in medieval ecclesiasticalmusic.
  4. (logic) Of, or relating to the modality between propositions.
  5. (statistics) Relating to the statistical mode.
  6. (computing) Having separate modes in which user input has different effects.
    Antonym: modeless
  7. (graphical user interface) Requiring immediate user interaction and thus presented so that it cannot be closed or interacted behind until a decision is made.
    • a. 2011, “Dialog Windows”, in Qt Widgets Documentation[1], archived from the original on February 7, 2020:
      Dialogs can be modal, in which case the user is required to provide necessary information before work in the main window can continue, or modeless. Modeless dialogs do not prevent the user from interacting with any of the other windows in the application.
    a modal dialog; a modal window
    Antonym: modeless
  8. (metaphysics) Relating to the form of a thing rather to any of its attributes.

SynonymsEdit

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. For synonyms and antonyms you may use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}}.

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from modal

Related termsEdit

Terms related to modal

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

modal (plural modals)

  1. (logic) A modal proposition.
  2. (linguistics) A modal form, notably a modal auxiliary.
  3. (grammar) A modal verb.
    • 1988, Andrew Radford, Transformational Grammar: A First Course, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 61:
      Using the same type of distributional criterion, we could argue that only a Verb (in its base form) can occur in the position marked — in (23) below to complete the sentence:
      (23)     They/it can —
      [...]
      Conversely, the only type of word which could be used to begin a three-word sentence such as (25) below:
      (25)     — I be frank?
      is a Modal: cf. [...]
  4. (graphical user interface) A modal window, one that cannot be closed until a decision is made.
    • 1996, OOPSLA '96: Conference on Object-Oriented Programming Systems, Languages, and Applications (volume 31, issues 10-12)
      Modal screen elements are subtrees which, when activated, disable all elements external to them. Examples of modals are yes-no message boxes and the application itself.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin modālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

modal (masculine and feminine plural modals)

  1. modal

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin modalis, from Latin modus 'mode'.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɔ.dal/
  • (file)
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

modal (feminine modale, masculine plural modaux, feminine plural modales)

  1. modal

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

modal m (plural modaux)

  1. a modal verb

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

modal (strong nominative masculine singular modaler, not comparable)

  1. modal

DeclensionEdit


IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

From Malay modal, from Tamil முதல் (mutal, principal, fund, capital, money yielding interest).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmo.d̪al]
  • Hyphenation: mo‧dal

NounEdit

modal (first-person possessive modalku, second-person possessive modalmu, third-person possessive modalnya)

  1. capital,
    1. money and wealth. The means to acquire goods and services, especially in a non-barter system.
    2. (figuratively) goods available for use as a factor of production, such as steam shovels (equipment) and office buildings (structures).

Derived termsEdit

derived terms
compounds

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Comprehensive Indonesian-English Dictionary, Ohio University Press, 2010, page 639

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: mo‧dal
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

AdjectiveEdit

modal m or f (plural modais, not comparable)

  1. modal (all senses)

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French modal

AdjectiveEdit

modal m or n (feminine singular modală, masculine plural modali, feminine and neuter plural modale)

  1. modal

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

modal (plural modales)

  1. modal

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit