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See also: PACA and раса

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Cuniculus paca

EtymologyEdit

Via Spanish paca and Portuguese paca, from Guaraní paka.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

paca (plural pacas)

  1. Any of the large rodents of the genus Cuniculus (but see also Cuniculus#Synonyms), native to Central America and South America, which have dark brown or black fur, a white or yellowish underbelly and rows of white spots along the sides.

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


Classical NahuatlEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pāca

  1. (transitive) to wash

ReferencesEdit

  • Andrews, J. Richard (2003) Workbook for Introduction to Classical Nahuatl, revised edition edition, Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, page 244
  • Campbell, R. Joe (1997), “Florentine Codex Vocabulary”, in (Please provide the title of the work)[1]
  • Karttunen, Francis (1983) An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl, Austin: University of Texas Press, page 182
  • Lockhart, James (2001) Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts, Stanford: Stanford University Press, page 228

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

paca (accusative singular pacan, plural pacaj, accusative plural pacajn)

  1. peaceful, not at war or disturbed by strife or turmoil
  2. peaceful, motionless and calm

Derived termsEdit


HungarianEdit

IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • puca (Cois Fharraige)

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle English pakke, from Proto-Germanic *pakkô (bundle, pack).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

paca m (genitive singular paca, nominative plural pacaí)

  1. pack (bundle to be carried)

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
paca phaca bpaca
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • "paca" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “paca” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “paca” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Via Spanish paca, from Guaraní paka.

NounEdit

paca m (invariable)

  1. (zoology) paca

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

paca

  1. inflection of pacare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pācā

  1. first-person singular present active imperative of pācō

PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

paca

  1. inflection of pacati (to cook):
    1. second-person singular imperative active
    2. first/third-person singular imperfect active

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

paca m

  1. genitive/accusative plural of pac

VerbEdit

paca

  1. third-person singular present of pacać

Further readingEdit

  • paca in Polish dictionaries at PWN

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old French pacque.

NounEdit

paca f (plural pacas)

  1. bale (bundle)
    Synonyms: fardo, lío

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown

NounEdit

paca f (plural pacas, masculine paco, masculine plural pacos)

  1. (colloquial, derogatory, Latin America) female police officer

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Guaraní paka.

NounEdit

paca f (plural pacas)

  1. (chiefly Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay) paca (rodent of the genus Cuniculus)
SynonymsEdit